Source Molecular Microbial Source Tracking
 
 
Microbial Source Tracking by Host
Source Tracking Human Host
Source Tracking Cattle Host
Source Tracking Swine Host
Source Tracking Bird Host
Source Tracking Gull Host
Source Tracking Goose Host
Source Tracking Chicken Host
Source Tracking Dog Host
Source Tracking Deer Host
Source Tracking Ruminant Host
Source Tracking Horse Host
Microbial Source Tracking and Fecal Detection Price List
Source Molecular Corporation, Leader in Molecular and Genetic Microbial Source Tracking

Microbial Source Tracking - Grant Opportunities

 

There are numerous governmental initiatives that allow organizations to receive grants for monitoring and remediation of impaired water bodies. Applying for such grants is often a solution to lack of funding or insufficient funds, when assembling a project. Knowing the source of contamination, when high fecal bacteria counts are present in the water, is important in order to take the appropriate remediation measures. Microbial Source Tracking could often be included as a component of a larger scale project/study or as a sole purpose project proposal, depending on the circumstances.

Grants that may assist in funding Microbial Source Tracking projects are listed below:

Potential National Microbial Source Tracking Funding
Chesapeake Bay Grant
EPA Grants
National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant
National Water Quality Initiative
NERRS Grant
NOAA Grants
NFWF Grant
Sustain Our Great Lakes Grants
USDA Grants
Water Resources Competitive Grants Program
WaterSMART Basin Study
Wells Fargo Grants
Canadian Research Grant
RBC Blue Water Project

Potential State Microbial Source Tracking Funding
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming


Chesapeake Bay Grant

Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund

DESCRIPTION: The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the federal-state Chesapeake Bay Program partnership, is soliciting proposals to restore water quality and habitats of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributary rivers and streams. NFWF estimates awarding up to $12 million in grants through the Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund in 2017, contingent on the availability of funding. Major funding for the Stewardship Fund comes from the EPA. The Stewardship Fund will award grants through two distinct grant programs: Small Watershed Grants (SWG) and Innovative Nutrient and Sediment Reduction Grants (INSR). SWG grants will be awarded for projects within the Chesapeake Bay watershed that promote community-based efforts to protect and restore the diverse natural resources of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributary rivers and streams.

DEADLINE: Proposals are due May 9, 2017.


EPA Grants

Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program

DESCRIPTION: The EPA is soliciting applications for grants and/or cooperative agreements to be awarded as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). Applications are requested for a project to continue monitoring and assessment of Great Lakes coastal wetlands. In order to be eligible, proposed projects must also: (i) protect, enhance, and/or restore the Great Lakes, including projects impacting connecting waterways such as Lake St. Clair and the St. Lawrence River (at or upstream from the point at which the St. Lawrence River becomes the international boundary between Canada and the United States); or (ii) protect Great Lakes ecosystem health, including human health. Up to approximately $10 million may be awarded incrementally over a five-year period (approximately $2 million per year) under the Request for Applications for one project contingent on the quality of applications received, funding availability and other applicable considerations. Non-federal governmental entities, including state agencies, interstate agencies, federally-recognized Indian tribes and tribal organizations, and local governments; institutions of higher learning; and nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply for funding.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

DESCRIPTION: The EPA is soliciting applications from eligible entities for grants and/or cooperative agreements to be awarded pursuant to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan II. The solicitation includes applications for projects under the Urban Watershed Management Implementation category. Nearshore water quality has increasingly become degraded and among the causes to this problem are bacteria and other pathogens, failing septic systems, etc. Nonpoint sources are now the primary contributors of many pollutants to the Great Lakes and their tributaries. The EPA expects to provide approximately $5.4 million for approximately 13 projects to reduce nonpoint source pollution from urban areas to the Great Lakes. Projects submitted in this category must address an urban nonpoint source problem. Proposals are limited to projects implementing an urban component(s) of existing watershed-based plans that are consistent with the components outlined in EPA's Nine Elements Guidance. Entities eligible to apply for grants include non-federal governmental entities, nonprofit organizations, and institutions.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.

Section 319 Nonpoint Source Pollution Grants

DESCRIPTION: Under Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 319, states, territories and tribes receive grant money that support a wide variety of activities including technical assistance, financial assistance, education, training, technology transfer, demonstration projects and monitoring, to mitigate nonpoint source pollution.  The U.S. EPA has identified NPS pollution as the largest source of water quality problems in the country, affecting 40 percent of its surveyed rivers, lakes, and estuaries.  One of the likely contaminants in NPS pollution is fecal bacteria.  Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies.  Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development.

DEADLINE: State Nonpoint Source Agencies apply with EPA in the spring (April-May), subgrantees/subawardees may apply with the Regional State Nonpoint Source Agencies according to their deadlines.

Urban Waters Small Grants

DESCRIPTION: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the Urban Waters Small Grants Program that funds research, studies, training, and demonstration projects that advances the restoration of urban waters by improving water quality through activities that also support community revitalization and other local priorities. The EPA is soliciting proposals from eligible applicants for projects that will advance EPA's water quality and environmental justice goals. Proposed projects will address urban runoff pollution through diverse partnerships that produce multiple community benefits, with emphasis on underserved communities. Eligible activities include stream/stormwater system surveys, investigations and/or monitoring efforts that involve the collection, assessment/analysis, and/or communication of existing/new water quality data as they relate to addressing urban runoff/stormwater pollution. One of the ways to determine if a water system has been infiltrated by sanitary sewer and combined sewer overflows is through microbial source tracking analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is an MST method that is primarily being used to detect human fecal contamination. Source Molecular has a handful of MST tests to check if the pathogens come from a human host. Eligible applicants include States, local governments, Indian Tribes, public and private universities and colleges, public or private nonprofit institutions/organizations, intertribal consortia, and interstate agencies. Applicants may not request more than $60,000 in EPA funding proposals requesting more than $60,000 in EPA funds are not eligible and will not be reviewed.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.



National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant

National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program (NCWCGP) provides States with financial assistance to protect and restore coastal wetlands, which are valued because they protect against flooding, help maintain water quality, and provide habitat for wildlife. Coastal environments are also important economically, generating billions of dollars annually through such industries as commercial fishing and tourism. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) of the Department of the Interior, Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program (WSFR) and The Refuge System's Division of Habitat and Resource Conservation administer the grant program. Eligible applicants are any State agency or entity designated as eligible by the Governor of a coastal State and they are encouraged to partner with Tribes, Federal agencies, other State agencies, non-governmental organizations, local governments and others. Eligible projects can include restoration, enhancement, or management of coastal wetlands ecosystems. Wetlands have its share of fecal pollution problems. A way to detect the source of fecal contamination is through microbial source tracking. Source Molecular specializes in real-time qPCR-based MST and its laboratory can detect and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources (Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant).

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


National Water Quality Initiative

National Water Quality Initiative

DESCRIPTION:: The Natural Resources Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture will work with farmers and ranchers in 165 small watersheds throughout the country to improve water quality where this is a critical concern. Under the National Water Quality Initiative, financial assistance will be available for the implementation of conservation systems to reduce nitrogen, phosphorous, sediment and pathogen contributions from agricultural land. These conservation systems may include practices such as edge-of-field water quality monitoring. Pathogens in waterways where water quality is a critical concern could include fecal bacteria. Knowing where the fecal bacteria came from could prove useful in improving water quality. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. In MST analysis, Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. NRCS will coordinate with local and state agencies, conservation districts, non-governmental organizations and others to implement this initiative.

DEADLINE: Almost every county in the Nation has a USDA Service Center. To get started, make an appointment at your local office local office or contact your State Conservationist.


NERRS Grant

NERRS Science Collaborative Funding Opportunity

DESCRIPTION: The National Estuarine Research Reserve System -- a network of 28 areas representing different bio-geographic regions of the United States that are protected for long-term research, water-quality monitoring, education and coastal stewardship -- works with local communities and regional groups to address natural resource management issues. Every year, the NERRS Science Collaborative seeks proposals for projects that incorporate collaboration and applied science to address a coastal management problem that has been identified as a priority for a Reserve and a community that it serves. Funding is provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Eligible applicants are NERRS staff working in partnership (if appropriate) with applicants from the United States (U.S.) academic, private, or public sectors. Researchers from institutions outside the U.S. may be included on the project subject to certain requirements.

DEADLINE: Proposals are due by May 15, 2017.


NOAA Grants

Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Grants

DESCRIPTION: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) adminiters the Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program Project Grants. The NOAA supports projects that will result in on-the-ground restoration of Great Lakes coastal habitat. Projects must be within an U.S. Great Lakes Area of Concern. Among others, priority consideration will be provided to those project proposals that restore coastal wetlands; propose sufficient, cost-effective monitoring appropriate to the scope and scale of the project to evaluate a project's benefits; among others. NOAA recognizes that water quality issues can impact habitat restoration efforts. However, projects dealing only with water quality improvement measures are not eligible. Should any of the projects need help in identifying the source of fecal contamination in water samples, Source Molecular's laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 different hosts (Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver, and Ruminant) using microbial source tracking. Eligible applicants are institutions of higher education, non-profits, and commercial (for profit) organizations, organizations under the jurisdiction of foreign governments, international organizations, and state, local and Indian tribal governments.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Mid-Atlantic Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION:The Sea Grant programs of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina seek regional scale research pre-proposals that address priorities of the state programs and the Mid-Atlantic region. Eligible projects for funding include water quality management and cross-disciplinary, integrative research that analyzes and synthesizes existing data to address major, large-scale issues of relevance to coastal and marine communities. A copy of the Request for Proposals is available here. Water quality monitoring projects could potentially include microbial source tracking analysis if fecal pollution is suspected. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. Proposals must include investigators from at least two participating Mid-Atlantic states. Projects that address the whole of or a large portion of the Mid-Atlantic and that include three or more states are of particular interest.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

NOAA Coastal Services Center Grants

DESCRIPTION: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is soliciting proposals for competitive funding for special projects and programs associated with NOAA's strategic plan and mission goals from institutions of higher education, non-profits, commercial organizations, international or foreign organizations or governments, individuals, state, local and Indian tribal governments. Projects must address, among others, pollution problems, pathogen outbreaks and water quality in coastal waters. Fecal pollution in coastal waters, for example, affects not only swimmers but also shellfish farms. Microbial source tracking methods are used to identify the source of fecal pollution. Source Molecular has been providing MST testing services for more than 10 years and its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 different hosts (Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant).

DEADLINE: Full applications must be submitted by September 30, 2017.


NFWF Grant

Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Program seeks to develop nation-wide-community stewardship of local natural resources, preserving these resources for future generations and enhancing habitat for local wildlife. Projects seek to address water quality issues in priority watersheds, such as erosion due to unstable streambanks, pollution from stormwater runoff, and degraded shorelines caused by development. The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) anticipates that approximately $2,500,000 in combined total funding will be available for this round of grants. Eligible projects include water quality monitoring and stormwater management. These monitoring efforts could involve the collection, assessment, analysis and communication of water quality data (existing or new) to identify areas of concern. Fecal contamination is a possible issue in addressing water quality concerns. There are a lot of ways to detect the source of fecal contamination. Source Molecular specializes in real-time qPCR microbial source tracking and its laboratory can detect and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources. Eligible applicants include non-profit 501(c) organizations, state government agencies, local governments, municipal governments, Indian tribes and educational institutions.

DEADLINE: Full Proposals are due January 31, 2017.


Sustain Our Great Lakes Grants

Sustain Our Great Lakes Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Sustain Our Great Lakes program is soliciting proposals to improve habitat and water quality in the Great Lakes basin. The program will award grants for: 1) stream habitat improvements; 2) coastal wetland habitat improvements; and 3) green storm water infrastructure in Great Lakes shoreline cities. Up to $7.8 million is expected to be available for grant awards in 2017. Eligible grant recipients include non-profit organizations, state, provincial, tribal and local governments, and educational institutions. The Sustain Our Great Lakes grants programs are administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and funded by ArcelorMittal, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S.D.A Forest Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

DEADLINE: Full proposals are due February 21, 2017.


USDA Grants

Emergency Community Water Assistance Grants

DESCRIPTION: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development awards Emergency Community Water Assistance Grants to assist rural communities that have experienced a significant decline in quantity or quality of drinking water due to an emergency, or in which such decline is considered imminent, to obtain or maintain adequate quantities of water that meets the standards set by the Safe Drinking Water Act. This emergency is considered an occurrence of an incident such as, but not limited to, a drought, earthquake, flood, tornado, hurricane, disease outbreak or chemical spill, leakage or seepage. In some instances, fecal pollution could make its way to drinking water sources during these emergency situations. For projects that require the identification of fecal contamination, microbial source tracking makes it possible. MST is a set of methods used to determine the host (Human, wildlife, farms, and domestic animals) that contributes fecal pollution to water bodies. Source Molecular uses Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technology to identify the presence of microorganisms in water samples based on the unique genetic sequence of that organism. Eligible applicants for Emergency Community Water Assistance Grants include public bodies, non-profit corporations and Indian tribes serving rural areas.

DEADLINE: Applications are accepted at any time through the USDA's Rural Development State and Area Offices. To locate an office, go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/recd_map.html.

Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program

DESCRIPTION: The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture administers the Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program - National Integrated Water Quality Program to address critical agricultural water quality issues in the United States. Eligible projects must address water availability (includes quantity and quality) as impacted by increasing climate variability can result in drought, impaired water quality and/or prolonged periods of rain and flooding. Among others, the Synthesis Project must review the effectiveness of NIFA-water funded projects and NIFA water programs (using targeted interviews and in-depth data collection and analysis) to create change in water resource management in rural, agricultural, and urbanizing watersheds. Data collection and monitoring could potentially include microbial source tracking analysis if fecal pollution is suspected. Source Molecular's laboratory can detect 13 different fecal pollution host sources (Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant). Colleges and universities including 1862, 1890, 1994 Land-Grant Institutions and Hispanic-serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACU) are eligible to submit applications for the National Integrated Water Quality Program (NIWQP).

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


Water Resources Competitive Grants Program

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program

DESCRIPTION: The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Institutes for Water Resources, requests proposals for matching grants to support research on the topic of improving and enhancing the nation's water supply; and promoting the exploration of new ideas that address or expand the understanding of water problems. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in water-related projects particularly those that involve microbial source tracking research and development. MST methods have been used to help identify nonpoint sources responsible for the fecal pollution of water systems. Any investigator at an accredited institution of higher learning in the United States is eligible to apply for a grant through a Water Research Institute or Center. Proposals may be for projects of 1 to 3 years in duration and may request up to $250,000 in federal funds.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


WaterSMART Basin Study

WaterSMART Basin Study

DESCRIPTION: The Bureau of Reclamation is seeking applications from entities interested in participating in the Basin Studies program. Basin studies are conducted throughout the West as part of Reclamation's role in the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART initiative, which helps to provide water managers better information to make decisions about water use. Eligible proposals include those that address water quality issues. Water quality could be affected by pathogens from animal and human waste. Poor water quality, in turn, would affect water supply. There are a lot of ways to detect the source of fecal contamination. Source Molecular specializes in real-time qPCR microbial source tracking and its laboratory can detect and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources. Entities must contribute at least 50 percent of the total costs as cash or in-kind services. Eligible non-Federal cost-share partners include states, tribes, water districts, cities, and other local governmental entities with water delivery or management authority located in the 17 Western States.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.


Wells Fargo Grants

Environmental Community Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: Financial services company Wells Fargo has a long-term partnership with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Wells Fargo and the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation are offering financial assistance through their program, Environmental Solutions for Communities, whose mission is to help communities create a more sustainable future through responsible environmental stewardship. One of the focus areas is water, particularly improving local water quality. Fecal pollution has been flagged as a concern in various water systems in the United States. Microbial source tracking methods are used to identify the source of fecal pollution. Source Molecular has been providing MST testing services for more than 12 years and its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 different hosts (Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant). Eligible applicants include non-profit 501(c) organizations, educational institutions, and state, tribal or local governments; working in states where Wells Fargo operates.

DEADLINE: To submit a topic for consideration please email a brief description to: environmental.affairs@wellsfargo.com.


Canadian Research Grant

Strategic Project Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada awards grants to projects that address effective management of water resources and aquatic ecosystems. Under this category, projects must focus on protecting source water; ensuring the quality, quantity and sustainability of water supply; using water efficiently in anthropogenic activities; and optimizing water treatment and distribution. Researchers are encouraged to develop new technologies, methods and analytical tools for treating industrial water and wastewater, and for remediating contaminated water for legacy or new and trace contaminants from industrial processes (such as pharmaceuticals and nanomaterials). For example, one of the projects already funded seeks to identify and evaluate alternative fecal indicator organisms and microbial source tracking tool, such as Bacteroidales genetic markers. Source Molecular fully supports research and development in the microbial source tracking industry.

To be considered, projects must be a collaboration of at least one academic researcher and at least one supporting organization, which must be a government organization or a Canadian-based company. In addition, foreign researchers may also work on the project as NSERC encourages international collaborations. Other acceptable participants include non-governmental organizations, government research laboratories, hospitals and clinics, foreign research institutions, venture capitalists, implementation sites, or potential customers, but these participants do not qualify as supporting organizations.

DEADLINE: April 1 every year


RBC Blue Water Project

Community Action Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Royal Bank of Canada's Blue Water Project is a wide-ranging, multi-year program that aims to help foster a culture of water stewardship. RBC Blue Water Project offers Community Action Grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000, which are awarded to local or community-based organizations in Canada, the United States or the Caribbean. The RBC Blue Water Project will focus on supporting initiatives that help protect and preserve water in towns, cities and urbanized areas with populations of more than 10,000 people that focus on, among others, protection and restoration of urban waterways; and improved urban water quality. Funded projects are expected to achieve measurable outcomes such as reduced water pollution and improved water quality of beaches. Fecal contamination is a concern with regards to water quality and poses a public health risk. Microbial source tracking plays a crucial role in identifying the source of fecal pollution. Knowing the source of fecal bacteria contaminating the water makes a big difference in crafting plans and policies to improve water quality. Source Molecular has helped many researchers with MST analysis. Only registered charities in Canada, United States and the Caribbean can apply for Community Action Grants.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


Alabama - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Section 319 Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) administers Section 319(h) Nonpoint Source Demonstration Grants to implement components of its Nonpoint Source Management Program. Proposals must incorporate significant actions or behaviors that will support progress in improving water quality impaired by nonpoint source (NPS) pollutants. Funds may also be used to develop and/or implement watershed management plans, mitigate NPS stormwater runoff, or protect groundwater. The U.S. EPA has identified NPS pollution as the largest source of water quality problems in the country, affecting 40 percent of its surveyed rivers, lakes, and estuaries. One of the likely contaminants in NPS pollution is fecal bacteria. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. State and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, public institutions, and private sector organizations are eligible to apply for Section 319(h) Nonpoint Source Demonstration Grant funding.

DEADLINE: The application period is currently closed.


Alaska - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Alaska Clean Water Actions Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, in awarding grants, gives high priority to projects related to water bodies identified by The Alaska's Clean Water Actions (ACWA). Eligible projects include projects that address stewardship actions; restoration projects on ACWA high priority waters that carry out identified priority restoration activities; and protection projects on ACWA high priority waters that include data collection and monitoring. Data collection and monitoring could potentially include microbial source tracking analysis if fecal pollution is suspected. Source Molecular's laboratory can detect 13 different fecal pollution host sources.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Alaska Beach Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation awards grants for projects related to monitoring marine water quality at Alaska's high-priority beaches. Grants are given to sample beach water for organisms (fecal coliforms and enterococci bacteria) that indicate the presence of fecal contamination. In controlling fecal pollution, it is important to determine the source of the bacteria. Source Molecular provides microbial source tracking analysis using the latest scientific laboratory equipment and analytical methods that enable it to identify with high confidence sources of microbial contamination. By notifying the public in the event that a sample exceeds the allowable levels, Alaska's Beach Grant Program helps to prevent illnesses that could result from exposure to contaminated beach water. Eligible applicants include local communities, tribal governments, and watershed councils.

DEADLINE: The current grant period is now closed.

Alaska Fish and Wildlife Fund

DESCRIPTION: The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, together with agency and private donor partners, requests proposals that aim to conserve species and habitats in Alaska and in its near coastal waters. The program is funded with Federal funds provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, USDA Forest Service, non-federal funds contributed by corporate partners, including BP, ConocoPhillips, and Shell, and non-federal funds received as community service payments from court settlements of various federal pollution laws. Among others, funds may be awarded to projects that protect or restore coastal watersheds, estuarine, and nearshore marine habitats. Fecal pollution is a possible problem in these water bodies. Identifying the source of fecal pollution, whether human or animal, is essential in crafting plans that would restore or protect these areas. Source Molecular uses scientifically rigorous genetic and molecular analytical methods that enable it to identify with high confidence sources of microbial contamination. Approximately $1,000,000 in grant funds is available. Eligible applicants for the Alaska Fish and Wildlife Fund include local, state, federal, and tribal governments and agencies (e.g., counties, townships, cities, boroughs), special districts (e.g., conservation districts, planning districts, utility districts), non-profit 501(c) organizations, schools and universities.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For more information, please contact Dr. Carly Vynne, Director of Wildlife & Habitat Conservation, at (202) 595-2464 or Carly.Vynne@nfwf.org.

Alaska Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: Alaska Sea Grant supports a number of formal, peer-reviewed research projects through a biennial call for proposals. The program seeks creative and innovative research proposals in the natural and social sciences that focus on the environmental and economic viability of Alaska's coastal communities. Alaska has 36,000 miles of coastline and waters offshore of Alaska cover about 75 percent of the U.S. continental shelf, hosting some of the world's most abundant populations of marine life. One of the objectives of the grant is to support healthy marine and coastal ecosystems in Alaska by providing decision makers with science-based information that can be used to craft well-informed policies governing the use and conservation of Alaska's marine and coastal resources.

DEADLINE: The deadline for pre-proposals is February 27, 2017. Full proposals are due June 1, 2017.


Arizona - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Water Quality Improvement Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) administers the Water Quality Improvement Grant (WQIG) Program to fund projects that implement on-the-ground water quality improvements to reduce nonpoint source pollution. The WQIG Program is a reimbursement-based grant program, which allocates money from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to interested parties for implementation of nonpoint source management and watershed protection. Some common pollutants in Arizona are bacteria, nutrients and sediment, with potential sources that include agriculture, forestry, grazing, septic systems, recreation, non-permit regulated urban runoff, construction and physical changes to stream channels. The ultimate goal is to prevent further impacts from such pollution and return Arizona's impaired waters to their designated uses. Nonpoint source pollution is the nation's largest source of water quality problems and occurs when rainfall or runoff picks up pollutants and deposits them in rivers, lakes or other groundwater sources. NPS pollution could likely include fecal contamination. In determining the source of fecal contamination, microbial source tracking has been known to produce accurate results. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. All public and private entities as well as individuals may apply for WQIG funding.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.

Arkansas - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

319 NPS Pollution Management Program Grants


DESCRIPTION: The Arkansas Natural Resources Commission (ANRC) funds 319 projects related to nonpoint source pollution management. Special emphasis is given to priority watersheds prioritized by the NPS Management Program Task Force. Projects for implementation, demonstration, and watershed planning to abate NPS pollution get priority. ANRC accepts work plans for projects to manage, reduce or abate NPS pollution. The current priority watersheds for 2011-2016 are: Illinois River, Upper White River, Lake Conway-Point Remove, Bayou Bartholomew, L'Anguille River, Upper Saline, Poteau River, Lower Ouachita-Smackover, Strawberry River, and Cache River. Eligible projects include in-stream water quality monitoring projects that support or assist the development of a 9-element watershed plan, or capture results of implementation within a NPS priority watershed. The U.S. EPA has identified NPS pollution as the largest source of water quality problems in the country, affecting 40 percent of its surveyed rivers, lakes, and estuaries. One of the likely contaminants in NPS pollution is fecal bacteria. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular uses a 27-step DNA extraction kit in conducting MST analysis of water samples to avoid false negative results. Eligible applicants for 319 NPS Pollution Management Program Grants include conservation districts, academic institutions, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations and groups.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


California - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

California Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: California Sea Grant (CASG) is one of 33 state programs funded by the National Sea Grant College Program, part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). California Sea Grant is administered by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. This year, applications for Special Focus Awards of 1-year duration, with a maximum budget of $25,000, will be accepted. Proposals must support the unique research of an enrolled graduate student working toward an advanced degree at a California university. Eligible projects include those that seek to conserve, restore and manage coastal and marine ecosystems to ensure their long-term health and productivity; and those that help reduce water contamination in the coastal and marine environment. The level of activity in California's coastal zone places immense pressure on the state's natural resources. Protecting water quality in the coastal areas is one of the funding priorities. The U.S. EPA has identified NPS pollution as the largest source of water quality problems in the country, affecting 40 percent of its surveyed rivers, lakes, and estuaries. One of the likely contaminants in NPS pollution is fecal bacteria. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular uses a 27-step DNA extraction kit in conducting MST analysis of water samples to avoid false negative results. Faculty and academic staff from universities and scientists from research institutions throughout California are invited to apply under the California Sea Grant College Program.

DEADLINE: This grant opportunity is open indefinitely.

Clean Beaches Initiative Grant

DESCRIPTION: The CBI Grant Program provides funding for projects that restore and protect the water quality and the environment of coastal waters, estuaries, bays, and near shore waters. The CBI Grant Program was initiated in response to the poor water quality and significant exceedences of bacterial indicators at California's beaches. Scientific studies have shown that water with high bacteria levels can cause infections, rashes, and gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. The primary goal of the CBI Grant Program is to implement projects that will reduce bacterial concentrations at public beaches. Projects must address a CBI Priority to be eligible for funding. The CBI Grant Program has identified priorities for implementation and research projects. For its Round 4 Solicitation, it is currently accepting concept proposals that, among others, conduct source identification studies to identify bacteria sources contributing to chronically impaired beaches.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Community Wetland Restoration Grants Program

DESCRIPTION: The Southern California Wetlands Recovery Project's (WRP) Community Wetland Restoration Grant Program (CWRGP) provides funding for community-based restoration projects in coastal wetlands and watersheds in the southern California region. Eligible projects include those that have a primary goal the restoration or preservation of a coastal wetland or coastal stream corridor in southern California from Point Conception to the Mexican border region, including watersheds in Mexico that drain to the Tijuana River. Should researchers need assistance identifying sources of fecal pollution in coastal wetlands or coastal stream corridors, Source Molecular has 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. In MST analysis, Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. Eligible applicants include 501c(3) nonprofit organizations, local government agencies, and university departments. Proposals from local government agencies and universities that partner with local nonprofit organizations on their proposed project will be looked upon more favorably than those that do not.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Local Groundwater Assistance (LGA) Grant Program

DESCRIPTION:The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) administers a Local Groundwater Assistance (LGA) Grant Program that awards grants for projects related to groundwater studies or groundwater monitoring and management activities. One of the possible issues that could be tackled by these projects is groundwater contamination associated with human activities. Human groundwater contamination can be related to waste disposal such as leaking septic tanks. Groundwater samples can be analyzed through microbial source tracking to confirm the source of contamination. Source Molecular has four Human tests -- Human Bacteroidetes ID™, Human Urine Virus ID™, and Human Fecal Virus ID™. Its laboratory can also detect 10 other fecal pollution host sources. Local public agencies with authority to manage groundwater resources are eligible to apply for Local Groundwater Assistance Grants. Successful applicants can each get up to $250,000 in funding.

DEADLINE: Grants will depend on availability of funds.

Nonpoint Source Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The State Water Resources Control Board's Division of Financial Assistance is accepting applications for the CWA 319(h) NPS Grant Program. Funds will be available for projects that, among others, implement activities that contribute to the restoration of NPS-impaired surface waters by controlling NPS pollution through reduced pollutant loads or concentrations as called for in an adopted or nearly adopted TMDL; and address watersheds and impairments identified in the NPS Program Preferences. A possible cause of impairment is the presence of fecal bacteria in water sources brought by runoff. Microbial Source Tracking is a series of scientific methods used to detect the sources that may be contributing to fecal pollution in the environment. Source Molecular delivers the results of MST tests in 5-10 working days, one of the fastest turnaround times in the industry. Eligible applicants for the CWA 319(h) NPS Grant Program include public agencies, nonprofit organizations, and Indian tribes. Eligible applicants are encouraged to collaborate with local entities involved in watershed management. Applicants must work with the appropriate Regional Water Board Contact prior to development of the Concept Proposal.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.

Proposition 84 Stormwater Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The State Water Resources Control Board of California is accepting Concept Proposal applications for the Proposition 84 Stormwater Grant Program (SWGP). Eligible projects include those that reduce and prevent stormwater contamination of rivers, lakes, and streams. Stormwater runoff is considered as the most common cause of water pollution in the United States. In many parts of California, flows over urban landscapes, as well as dry weather flows from urban areas, are the most significant source of pollutants that contribute to water quality degradation. Pollutants include fecal matter from various sources. In order to determine the source of fecal contamination, microbial source tracking has been used by a number of researchers. More than that, a carefully designed MST analysis can also discriminate between fecal contamination due to stormwater run-off and due to bacterial persistence and regrowth. Source Molecular has a team of scientists with expertise in genetic and molecular sciences that has assisted hundreds of researchers with their MST-based studies. Eligible applicants are restricted to local public agencies. A local public agency means any city, county, city and county, or district. A joint powers authority comprised entirely of local public agencies is also an eligible applicant. Source Molecular has worked with a number of stormwater managers in California with their source identification projects.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Urban Streams Restoration Program

DESCRIPTION: The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) is soliciting proposals for Urban Streams Restoration Program (USRP) grants. Approximately $8 million is available statewide for this funding cycle. All proposals must have two applicants, a sponsor and co-sponsor. One applicant must be a local public agency and the other a citizens' group. Projects funded by the URSP must be designed for a creek, stream, or river that crosses built-up residential, commercial, or industrial property, or which crosses land where, in the near future, the land use will be residential, commercial, or industrial. Additionally, projects must, among others, protect, restore or enhance ecological viability of riparian or riverine ecosystems. Eligible costs include water testing. Proposal Solicitation Package & Application

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

USC Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The University of Southern California Sea Grant Program funds projects that are directed at solving the particular problems associated with urbanization in and adjacent to the coastal zone. One of the focus areas of the USC Sea Grant Strategic Plan for 2014-2017 is healthy coastal ecosystems. Stormwater runoff from streets, channels and rivers remains a contributor to large concentrations of pathogens to the urban coast. Many of the projects USC Sea Grant funds or manages not only try to determine the level of contamination throughout urban watersheds and along the Southern California coast, but also develop faster and less costly ways to measure these levels. USC Sea Grant will continue funding and managing projects that determine responses of marine organisms to contaminants and pathogens and develop effective bio-indicators of contamination. Microbial source tracking analysis has been shown to produce highly accurate results when it comes to detecting the presence of fecal indicators in water samples and determining the host source. For more than 10 years, Source Molecular has analyzed thousands of samples making it one of the leaders in the microbial source tracking industry. It is anticipated that 4-6 projects will be funded with the biennial Sea Grant College Program funds. Project budgets will range from $10,000 to $65,000, with the average being approximately $50,000 for new research. University faculty and academic staff at USC and at other California institutions are eligible to apply.

DEADLINE: The Request for Preliminary Proposals has concluded. Contact Phyllis Grifman at grifman@usc.edu for more information on the funding.


Colorado - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Colorado Healthy Rivers Fund Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Colorado Water Conservation Board and the Water Quality Control Commission established the Colorado Healthy Rivers Fund Grant Program in cooperation with the Colorado Watershed Assembly. The Program helps support local watershed organizations in their efforts to provide clean water, protect habitat, and improve recreation and accessibility. Eligible projects for funding include water quality and/or water quantity monitoring; participation in the development and/or implementation of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs); implementation of watershed-related best management practices; data collection and assessment; among others. Microbial source tracking has been widely used in TMDL development and implementation. Specifically, researchers have used MST to identify the sources that contribute to the observed impairment, determine which sources are likely the most dominant in the watershed of interest, and focus management actions through targeting implementation and identifying controls that are appropriate and relevant to the identified sources. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. The Company uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment in microbial source tracking. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts. Eligible applicants for the Healthy Rivers Fund Grants include local watershed protection groups who are committed to a collaborative approach to the restoration and protection of lands and natural resources within Colorado's watersheds.

DEADLINE: Applications are due April 30 of each year. An Applications Committee reviews and makes recommendations to the Designees of the fund by July 31. The Designees approve or deny the recommendations, and Grants are awarded by September 30. Annual progress reports are due by September 30 of the following year.

Nonpoint Source Program

DESCRIPTION: The Nonpoint Source Management Area (NPS Program) of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment funds nonpoint source projects as a result of receiving a federal grant under section 319(h) of the federal Clean Water Act (CWA). The NPS Program has two overarching objectives: restore waterbodies not meeting water quality standards by addressing nonpoint source water quality impacts; and protect existing water quality from future nonpoint source pollution. To be eligible under the grant program, projects must implement the 2012 Colorado Nonpoint Source Management Plan. Funding is limited to (1) Implementation projects that restore impaired waters and are identified in EPA nine element WBPs. Typically, these projects construct on-the-ground best management practices (BMPs) to address nonpoint source impacts to water quality; and (2) Watershed-based plans projects that develop or update EPA nine element WBPs.

DEADLINE: Applications must be submitted by January 17, 2017.

Water Supply Reserve Account Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Colorado Water Conservation Board administers the Water Supply Reserve Account Grant (WSRA) Program, which provides grants and loans to assist Colorado water users in addressing their critical water supply issues and interests. Projects eligible for funding can relate to technical assistance regarding permitting, feasibility studies and environmental compliance, among others. Detailed guidelines for applications can be found here. Microbial source tracking could be a possible activity as researchers undertake environmental compliance studies. Source Molecular has assisted numerous researchers in MST analysis. The Company provides support with project design as well as sampling materials at no cost. Eligible applicants for Colorado's Water Supply Reserve Account Grants include municipalities, enterprises, counties, State of Colorado agencies; special, water and sanitation, conservancy, conservations, irrigation and water activity enterprises; mutual ditch companies, homeowners associations and non-profit corporations; individuals, partnerships and sole proprietors; and non-governmental organizations.

DEADLINE: Specific deadline depends on account grant applied for. But there are five "review periods" for applications.


Connecticut - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Clean Water Fund Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Clean Water Fund (CWF) provides a combination of grants and loans to municipalities, which undertake water pollution control projects at the direction of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. Projects eligible for funding include non-point source pollution control projects affecting Long Island Sound. The U.S. EPA has identified NPS pollution as the largest source of water quality problems in the country, affecting 40 percent of its surveyed rivers, lakes, and estuaries. One of the likely contaminants in NPS pollution is fecal bacteria. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular uses a 27-step DNA extraction kit in conducting MST analysis of water samples to avoid false negative results. Municipalities and private water systems eligible for Drinking Water fund may apply for this grant.

DEADLINE: None. Proposals accepted on a continual basis and awarded as funds become available.

Connecticut Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: Connecticut Sea Grant supports a broad range of applied research, education, and extension activities aimed at improving understanding, assessment, use, management, conservation, or restoration of marine and coastal resources. Priorities related to water quality include developing and/or assessing mitigation measures, best management practices and innovative site designs to address water quality concerns; and identifying and assessing critical scientific management and restoration needs and develop strategies for improving Long Island Sound water quality. Emphasis has also been made as to a proposal's central research component and ability to produce new knowledge and further the goals of the Connecticut Sea Grant Strategic Plan within the time-frame. Fecal contamination is a possible issue in addressing water quality concerns. There are a lot of ways to detect the source of fecal contamination. Source Molecular specializes in real-time qPCR microbial source tracking and its laboratory can detect and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources. Sea Grant support is available to researchers and educators at all non-profit academic institutions, research laboratories, and outreach/education facilities in Connecticut.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Non-point Source (Section 319) Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection administers the Nonpoint Source (Section 319) Grant Program. Project priorities for FY2015 include Watershed Based Plan Implementation Projects, Implementation Projects Not Associated with WBPs, Watershed Based Plan Development, and Implementation of Non Structural Best Management Practices. Among others, Section 319 funds may be used to support monitoring, modeling, assessment, and trackdown studies relevant to the control of nonpoint source pollution. Microbial source tracking has been widely used in TMDL development and implementation. Specifically, researchers have used MST to identify the sources that contribute to the observed impairment, determine which sources are likely the most dominant in the watershed of interest, and focus management actions through targeting implementation and identifying controls that are appropriate and relevant to the identified sources. Any interested public or private organization in Connecticut can apply for Connecticut's Non-point Source (Section 319) Grants.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Long Island Sound Futures Fund

DESCRIPTION: The Long Island Sound Futures Fund (Futures Fund) is soliciting proposals to achieve clean water and healthy watersheds, restore habitats and abundant wildlife, and enhance public education and participation for Long Island Sound. The Futures Fund grant program is administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) in collaboration with and with support from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Long Island Sound Study (LISS), and US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Among the program priorities is Clean Water and Healthy Watersheds, which includes monitoring water quality of the Sound or its embayments. Monitoring must be related to an impaired waterbody as designated under the Clean Water Act, Section 305(b) in Connecticut and New York; and the monitoring must demonstrate that data collected will used to address use impairments (i.e., reduce annual beach-day closures, open closed shellfish beds etc.). Approximately $20,000 to $65,000 in Planning and Water Quality Monitoring Grants may be awarded to water quality monitoring projects. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. Eligible applicants for the Long Island Sound Futures Fund include non-profit 501(c) organizations; state, tribal, and local governments; and academic and educational institutions.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.



Delaware - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Community Water Quality Improvement Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control provides financial assistance every year through the Community Water Quality Improvement Grant (CWQIG). Grants are awarded to projects that focus on how to improve water quality in designated impaired watersheds consistent with specific plans developed for watershed improvements. In fiscal year 2016, $350,000 will be made available in grants for Community Water Quality Implementation Projects within Delaware's developed landscape to improve water quality in impaired watersheds with established total maximum daily loads (TMDLs). Stormwater retrofits, stream and wetland restoration, implementation and evaluation of new Best Management Practices (BMPs), and other nonpoint source water pollution control projects not currently feasible for funding through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund program will be selected by the Delaware Water Infrastructure Advisory Council (DWIAC) through a competitive grant process for funding.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For more information, contact Sharon Webb, Nonpoint Source Pollution Program at (302) 739-9922 or by email at Sharon.Webb@state.de.us.

Delaware Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Delaware Sea Grant College Program is finalizing a strategic plan (2018–2021) that includes additional background about the program and provides an overview of research and outreach priorities and future directions organized by topical Focus Areas: (1) Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, (2) Resilient Communities and Economies, (3) Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture, and (4) Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development. The strategic plan is an integrated response to the research, education, and outreach needs identified for Delaware, the Mid-Atlantic region, and the nation.

DEADLINE: Full proposal are due May 26, 2017.

Section 319 Nonpoint Source Grants

DESCRIPTION: Delaware's 319 grant is divided into base and incremental funds. Base funds are used to provide staffing and support to manage and implement the state Nonpoint Source Management Program. Base funds help in implementing projects to identify and address nonpoint source problems and threats, as well as funding activities that involve specific waterbodies in that state or statewide or regional projects. A portion of these funds (up to 20 percent) may be used for planning and assessment activities such as conducting assessments, developing Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs), and creating programs to solve nonpoint source problems. EPA has issued supplemental grant guidelines that identify priority activities to be funded with section 319 incremental and base funds. Incremental Funds are used for the development and implementation of watershed-based plans and Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for impaired waters. These funds are used to restore impaired waters.

DEADLINE: Applications are due May 10 for funding in the next fiscal year.

Surface Water Matching Planning Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Delaware Water Infrastructure Advisory Council (WIAC) developed the Surface Water Matching Planning Grant program to support the planning/preliminary engineering/ feasibility analysis of surface water improvement projects and activities that focus on the developed landscape to improve water quality in impaired watersheds in Delaware. The grants are intended for the planning/preliminary engineering/feasibility analysis of stormwater retrofits, green technology practices, stream and wetland restoration projects, small watershed studies, development of master surface water and drainage plans, and other point and non-point source water pollution control projects. Among others, eligible projects should be located in a targeted watershed with an established or proposed TMDL or watershed with an approved watershed restoration or pollution control strategy. Applicants may be any Delaware state, county, or municipal government, government agency or governmental subdivision or program.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For further details, contact James Sullivan via telephone at (302) 739-9921 or via email at James.Sullivan@state.de.us.


Florida - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Florida Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Florida Sea Grant funds research projects that address these areas of focus: Healthy Oceans and Coasts; Safe and Sustainable Seafood; Sustainable Coastal Communities; and Hazard-Resilient and Climate Ready Coasts. Priorities for funding include development and testing of new methods and best management practices for restoring or enhancing coastal habitat; and development and testing of user-friendly tools with coastal communities to guide interactive decision making for becoming more resilient to storms, rising sea level and changing rainfall and runoff. Fecal contamination in coastal waters is a possible issue that could be included in these projects. Should researchers need to determine the source of fecal contamination, microbial source tracking analysis is a useful tool. Source Molecular's MST laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. Florida Sea Grant functions as a partnership of universities, marine industries, citizens and government. It is hosted by the University of Florida.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Section 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Nonpoint Source Management Section (NPSM) administers grant money received from the U.S. EPA through Section 319 of the Federal Clean Water Act. These grant funds are used to implement projects to manage nonpoint sources of pollution and restore our impaired water bodies. NPS pollution is the leading cause of water pollution in Florida today. Managing NPS pollution at the source is critical to meeting the restoration goals, including Total Maximum Daily Loads, for impaired waters as required by the Clean Water Act. Source Molecular has worked with water managers in the development of TMDL limits and implementing Best Management Practices (BMPs). Eligible activities under the grant include monitoring activities to evaluate BMP effectiveness for projects implemented as part of a Basin Management Action Plan/EPA-approved Watershed Plan; and monitoring activities for projects funded by the Section 319(h) grant. Eligible grant recipients include state agencies, local governments, colleges, universities, non-profit organizations, public utilities, and state water management districts and priority is given to recipients actively engaging in the Basin Management Action Plan process. In recent years, the EPA has awarded between $5 million and $6 million of Section 319 funds annually to the state of Florida to implement projects and activities designed to reduce the impacts of NPS pollution.

DEADLINE: Project proposals are due March 15, 2017, for review and ranking. For further information, please contact Kate Merchant at 850-245-2952 or kathryn.merchant@dep.state.fl.us.

TMDL Water Quality Restoration Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Florida Department of Environmental Protection administers the TMDL Water Quality Restoration Grant, which provides funding for the implementation of best management practices designed to reduce pollutant loads to impaired waters from urban stormwater discharges. Eligible projects include those that reduce stormwater pollutant loadings from urban areas that discharge to waterbodies on the state's verified list of impaired waters; and include storm event monitoring to determine the actual load reduction. Nonpoint sources are most apparent after storm events and are the cause of many water system impairments. Microbial source tracking is a set of methods used to determine the host (different animals or Human) that contributes fecal pollution to a variety of water bodies. MST has been applied to total maximum daily load (TMDL) assessment and has been used as a tool for identifying the source of the pollution and allowing for appropriate remediation and preventative measures to be taken. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development and its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 different hosts (Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant). The TMDL Water Quality Restoration Grant funds are used for construction of best management practices, monitoring to determine pollutant load reductions, or public education activities specifically associated with the project and may only occur after the date of contract.

DEADLINE: Applications are continually accepted and projects are ranked in March, July, and November. Any questions regarding the grant should be directed to Kathryn Brackett at Kathryn.Brackett@dep.state.fl.us, 850-245-2952.


Georgia - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Section 319(h) Nonpoint Source Implementation Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GAEPD) receives an annual grant under Section 319(h) of the Clean Water Act to help prevent, control and/or abate nonpoint source pollution in support of Georgia's Nonpoint Source Management Program. Eligible applicants are public entities such as city or county governments with Qualified Local Government status; regional and State agencies; authorities that operate public service or delivery programs (e.g. sewer, water); regional commissions; resource conservation and development councils; county extensions; and local school systems and State colleges and universities. Projects must (a) implement existing watershed-based plans that adequately address USEPA's Nine Elements for Watershed Planning; (b) focus within a single 10-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC-10) or smaller; and (c) commit to a minimum 40% non-federal cash or in-kind Match. Proposals must also specify the nonpoint sources of pollution and identify the activities best suited to address these sources, which can include: TMDL implementation; watershed restoration; local regulatory or non-regulatory enforcement programs; urban stormwater controls not included in NPDES permits; technical and financial assistance; education and training; and water quality monitoring to evaluate success of management practices. Microbial source tracking could be a component of a project that seeks to identify the sources of fecal contamination in a water system.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.

Coastal Incentive Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Coastal Resources Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources is requesting proposals for Coastal Incentive Grants. Eligible projects include those that address stormwater quantity and quality improvements utilizing BMPs recommended by the Georgia Coastal Stormwater Supplement. One of the issues affecting coastal waters is fecal pollution, which may come from stormwater discharge, urban runoff, leaking sewage pipes, among others. Should a need arise to identify the fecal source, microbial source tracking analysis has been shown to produce highly accurate results. Source Molecular, which has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development, provides support to researchers with project design as well as sampling materials at no cost. Eligible applicants for Coastal Incentive Grants include county and municipal governments in the 11 coastal counties in Georgia, regional and state agencies (other than DNR) and state affiliated educational and research institutions.

DEADLINE: Full applications are due by February 17, 2017.

Georgia Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: For the 2018-2020 funding cycle, Georgia Sea Grant is soliciting two-year research proposals that address goals stated in the draft Georgia Sea Grant Strategic Plan. The overarching goal of the research program is to support outcome-oriented research projects that span broad areas of natural, physical, social, behavioral and economic sciences and engineering. Investigators are encouraged to integrate social science approaches, economics and the use of information technology into the research where appropriate.

DEADLINE: Full proposals are due July 3, 2017.



Hawaii - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

319 Grants Program

DESCRIPTION: The Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch's Polluted Runoff Control Program administers grant money it receives from the EPA through Section 319(h) of the Federal Clean Water Act to address Hawaii's polluted runoff. Generally, projects must include activities related to polluted runoff control within the priority watersheds. Proposed projects should include implementation of a component of an existing watershed management plan, total maximum daily load (TMDL), or other work/action plan to address water quality issues. Projects should have a reasonable expectation of delivering water quality improvements. The current Request for Proposals is focused on implementation projects on the island of Kauai outlined in these approved Watershed Based Plans (WBPs): Hanalei Bay Watersheds WBP; and/or Nawiliwili Bay Watersheds WBP. The DOH will fund proposals that measurably improve water quality. Proposals from other locations, arising out of effective WBPs, TMDL Implementation Plans, or Management Plans will be evaluated. Among others, projects should be designed to improve water quality and address nonpoint source pollution issues such as Enterococci. Microbial source tracking has been widely used in TMDL development and implementation. Specifically, researchers have used MST to identify the sources of fecal pollution in water systems. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development. The Company uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment in its MST analysis. Organizations including counties, colleges and universities, State agencies, non-profit entities, watershed groups, for-profit organizations, and environmental groups may submit proposals. Federal agencies can participate in the project, but may not apply for grant funds.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. Contact the Polluted Runoff Control Program (CleanWaterBranch@doh.hawaii.gov or 808-586-4309) for more information about submitting grant proposals.

Community Restoration Partnership

DESCRIPTION: The Hawaii Community Foundation (HCF) and its partners - the Harold K. L. Castle Foundation, The Weissman Family Foundation, The Hawaii Tourism Authority, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Marisla Foundation - are soliciting applications for their Community Restoration Partnership (CRP). This funding opportunity provides support for on-the-ground lower watershed and coastal restoration projects in Hawaii that are led by local community groups and focus on durable and sustainable positive impacts on the environment. Requests of up to $50,000 will be considered for any individual restoration project for the grant award period of January 1 to December 31, 2015. Special consideration may be given to projects that restore and/or coral reef habitat, coastal wetlands and estuaries, among others.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Ma'ili'ili Watershed Implementation Projects

DESCRIPTION: The City and County of Honolulu (CCH) and the State of Hawaii (State), Department of Health (DOH), Clean Water Branch (CWB), Polluted Runoff Control (PRC) Program will fund specific implementation projects that control or reduce land-based nonpoint source pollution to restore and protect water quality in the Ma'ili'ili Watershed on the island of O'ahu. Eligible implementation projects are those that seek to achieve measurable water quality improvements such as reduction in the number of beach postings due to elevated bacteria counts and reduction in concentration or total loadings of priority pollutants like bacteria. Thus actual water quality or management measure monitoring tasks are necessary. Organizations including counties, colleges and universities, State agencies, non-profit entities, watershed groups, for-profit organizations, and environmental groups may submit proposals. Funding will be done through a reimbursement contract, in which the awarded Contractor will be reimbursed by the State for eligible costs expended on the project on a quarterly basis.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. Contact the Polluted Runoff Control Program (CleanWaterBranch@doh.hawaii.gov or 808-586-4309) for more information about submitting grant proposals.

University Of Hawai'i Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program accepts proposals that integrate physical, biological, and social sciences toward addressing issues that are relevant to living sustainably along coasts will be especially encouraged. One of the focus areas of the program is sustainable coastal development. It aims to provide information for decision-makers and stakeholders to facilitate the development and implementation of new coastal policies, plans, management approaches and conflict resolution strategies related to sustainable coastal development. A healthy coastal ecosystem is a cross-cutting theme that plays a significant role in the selection of goals and objectives in the focus areas. Water quality degradation has been observed as development along the coast intensifies. One of the threats to aquatic-based businesses is fecal contamination. Microbial Source Tracking is a series of scientific methods used to detect the sources that may be contributing to fecal pollution in the environment. Source Molecular is dedicated to the field of microbial source tracking using the most advanced genomic and molecular techniques. Source Molecular has helped many researchers with MST-related studies. Faculty from universities and colleges, state, local and Indian tribal governments, organizations, and individuals in Hawaii and US Pacific territories are encouraged to apply for the Sea Grant.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Watershed Implementation Projects

DESCRIPTION: The State of Hawaii (State) Department of Health (DOH) Clean Water Branch (CWB) Polluted Runoff Control (PRC) Program's mission is to protect and improve the quality of water resources by preventing and reducing nonpoint source pollution. To achieve this goal, the PRC Program funds implementation projects that control polluted runoff. The FY15 Watershed Implementation Projects Request for Proposals (RFP) will fund implementation projects to prevent or reduce polluted runoff in He'eia watershed on the island of O'ahu. Proposals for implementation projects in other locations arising out of approved watershed based plans (WBPs) or Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Implementation Plans will be considered, but there is a preference for implementation projects located in He'eia watershed. An example of a project that may receive funding includes expanding the size and scope of an existing U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 319(h)-funded implementation project, if the existing project measurably demonstrates an improvement in water quality, and the expansion will significantly increase water quality improvements. Organizations including counties, colleges and universities, State agencies, non-profit entities, watershed groups, for-profit organizations, and environmental groups may submit proposals. Federal agencies can participate in the proposed project, but may not apply for grant funds.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


Idaho - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Nonpoint Source Management 319 Subgrants

DESCRIPTION: The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Nonpoint Source Management 319 Subgrants program. A 319 grant can be used to fund surface and ground water protection and remediation projects that intend to implement accepted management practices to reach their desired goal. The grant can also fund projects whose goal is to develop new and innovative techniques for protecting or improving water quality. Each year the largest share of the state's 319 funding goes to projects that target reducing specific pollutant loads (total maximum daily loads [TMDLs]) in priority 303(d)-listed waters. Some examples of projects that would be eligible to receive funding include those that intend to address stormwater discharges and discharges to surface and groundwater from animal feedlot operations and grazing. Microbial source tracking has been widely used in TMDL development and implementation. Specifically, researchers have used MST to identify the sources of fecal bacteria contaminating water bodies. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. The Company uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment in microbial source tracking. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts (Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant).

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


Illinois - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Section 319(h) Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Financial Assistance Program

DESCRIPTION: The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (Illinois EPA) regularly seeks proposals for nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control projects.  Projects given high priority include those that would develop a Watershed Based Plan to address NPS pollution and develop a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) or TMDL Implementation Plan to address NPS Pollution.  Priority will also be given to applications that show that the project is to be designed, implemented and monitored to show measurable environmental results such as quantifying water quality improvements and estimating or modeling pollutant load reductions associated with innovative demonstration projects or programs.  Fecal pollution is a prevalent and serious problem occurring in many water systems within the United States.  Microbial source tracking plays a crucial role in identifying the source of fecal pollution.  Knowing the source of fecal bacteria contaminating the water makes a big difference in crafting plans and policies to improve water quality.  Source Molecular has helped many researchers with MST analysis.  The Illinois EPA funds approximately 15-25 projects per year under the Section 319(h) Grant Program.  This number is dependent upon the grant funds available, the number of applications received and the amount that is requested by the applicants.  The maximum Section 319(h) amount is 60% while the minimum local match requirement is 40%.  Groups eligible for Section 319(h) Grant Program Funds include state and local government; watershed organizations; citizen and environmental groups; land conservancies or trusts; public and private profit and not-for profit organizations; and universities and colleges.  Additional information can be found here.

DEADLINE: Applications are accepted June 1 through August 1 every year.


Indiana - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Section 319(h) Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) is accepting grant applications for Section 319(h) funding for various types of projects that work to reduce nonpoint source water pollution. Funds may be used to conduct assessments, develop and implement TMDLs and watershed management plans, provide technical assistance, demonstrate new technology and provide education and outreach. Organizations eligible for funding include nonprofit organizations, universities, and local, state or federal government agencies. Nonpoint source pollution does not come from a pipe, but results when water (rain or snowmelt) moves across land, such as city streets, agricultural fields and residential areas, and picks up sediment, fertilizers, pesticides, animal wastes, motor oil and other pollutants. Nonpoint source pollution is the leading cause of water quality problems in Indiana and is responsible for many of the impairments identified on the CWA Section 303(d) List of Impaired Waters (303(d) List). IDEM’s NPS Program provides funding and technical assistance to groups that work with citizens to develop locally-based solutions to NPS pollution. Specific ways to address NPS water pollution include conducting watershed inventories and water quality assessments for the purpose of developing comprehensive watershed management plans (WMPs); implementing approved WMPs, including implementation of best management practices (BMPs) that directly reduce sources of NPS pollution; and education and outreach on watershed management.

DEADLINE: Notice of Intent (NOI) emails for the FFY 2018 grant solicitation are due June 1, 2017. Applications for FFY 2018 Section 319 grant funds are due September 1, 2017.


Iowa - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Watershed Planning Grants

DESCRIPTION:The Iowa Department of Natural Resources awards grants that aim to develop a Watershed Management Plan (WMP), which identifies problems in the watershed and proposes solutions for better water quality. Eligible grant applicants include local or regional public and private organizations or agencies able to collaborate with other local stakeholders within Iowa watersheds to develop WMPs. Applicants are required to contribute a local cost-share match of at least 50 percent of the grant (a match-to-grant ratio of 1:2). DNR watershed grants are made possible by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, through funding provided in Section 319 of the federal Clean Water Act. Grant funds can be used for water monitoring costs including sampling and laboratory fees. Should a need arise to identify the fecal source in contaminated water bodies, microbial source tracking analysis has been shown to produce highly accurate results. Source Molecular uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment in microbial source tracking. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts.

DEADLINE: Applications are accepted every year. Please contact the basin coordinators and watershed grant staff for more details.

Watershed Implementation Grants

DESCRIPTION:The Iowa Department of Natural Resources awards Watershed Implementation Grants to give funding and assistance to local groups to put a Watershed Management Plan into action. These plans identify problems in a watershed, develop solutions to improve water quality and create strategies to put the plan into action. Applicants must have a completed Watershed Management Plan (WMP) to apply for a DNR Watershed Implementation Grant. Eligible applicants include Soil and water conservation districts, county conservation boards, resource conservation and development agencies, councils of government, regional planning commissions, city governments, county governments, public utilities, community colleges, colleges or universities, public solid waste agencies, drainage districts, local chambers of commerce, not-for-profit local watershed or community organizations or foundations, and other non-governmental not-for-profit organizations or associations capable of implementing a WMP. Grant funds can be used for water quality improvement activities identified in the WMP including control of agricultural and non-agricultural sources of nonpoint source pollution. Source Molecular has been assisting researchers in various NPS-related projects that have a component for microbial source tracking analysis. Guidelines for application can be found here.

DEADLINE: The current grant round has closed.


Kansas - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

WRAPS Grant Funds

DESCRIPTION:WRAPS grant funds are available to finance projects under the Kansas Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategy (WRAPS). WRAPS is a planning and management framework that engages stakeholders within a particular watershed in a process to (a) identify watershed restoration and protection needs and opportunities; (b) establish management goals for the watershed community; (c) create a cost-effective action plan to achieve goals; and (d) implement the action plan. One of the concerns in watershed protection is fecal pollution of the water systems. Microbial source tracking plays a crucial role in identifying the source of fecal pollution. Knowing the source of fecal bacteria contaminating the water makes a big difference in crafting plans and policies to protect Kansas' watersheds. Source Molecular has helped many researchers with MST analysis. Anyone may apply for WRAPS funds, but a framework phase or a combination of phases must be identified, for example Development, Assessment, Planning and Implementation. Applications are completed online via the Kansas Clean Water System (KCW).

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


Kentucky - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools. Kentucky American Water's 10-county service area cover Bourbon, Clark, Fayette, Gallatin, Grant, Harrison, Jessamine, Owen, Scott and Woodford counties.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Section 319(h) Nonpoint Source Implementation Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Kentucky NPS Pollution Control Program seeks projects to compete for funding. Grants are available for watershed-based plan development and implementation, protection of Special Use Waters with identified threats, as well as other nonpoint source pollution control projects to help mitigate or prevent runoff pollution. Priority consideration will be given to applications for watershed plan development and implementation in 303(d) listed streams and protection of threatened Special Use Waters. NPS pollutants, such as pesticides, fertilizers, nutrients, metals, sediment, bacteria, and other pathogens resulting from various land use activities, are picked up by rainwater or snowmelt and carried into Kentucky’s streams, groundwater, rivers and lakes. NPS pollutants can affect the safety of drinking water, make waters unsafe for recreational activities and destroy natural aquatic ecosystems.

DEADLINE: Project proposals forms must be submitted by April 21, 2017.

Stormwater Quality Projects Incentive Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Stormwater Quality Projects Incentive Grant Program has been established to assist property owners, businesses, and organizations in the implementation of projects that serve to improve water quality through innovation and education throughout Fayette County. The Incentive Grant Program is funded by the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG) Water Quality Management Fee (WQMF) and administered by the Division of Water Quality (DWQ). The goal of the Incentive Grant Program is the improvement of water quality in Fayette County. To accomplish this goal, the program will provide financial assistance for projects that address stormwater concerns, improve water quality, reduce stormwater runoff, and/or educate residents on stormwater quality. Fecal contamination has been identified as one of the causes of water impairment. Source Molecular provides assistance in identifying sources of fecal contamination. In particular, Source Molecular conducts microbial source tracking analysis using quantitative PCR DNA technology to give clients highly accurate results.

DEADLINE: Applications are due May 12, 2017.


Louisiana - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

CWA 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) is soliciting proposals for potential Clean Water Act (CWA) 319 funding for implementation projects. The objective for the use of these funds is to improve water quality and/or restore the waterbody in watersheds that are listed as impaired on the State's 303(d) list. The preference is that these funds support efforts that will take less than 2 years to complete, and may include enforceable measures such as assistance with implementation of ordinances, or additional water quality monitoring to verify whether the management measures or best management practices (BMPs) implemented previously are addressing the loadings and reducing impacts and/or restoring the impaired waterbody. Microbial source tracking analysis could be a component in large projects related to water quality, particularly when there's a need to determine the source of fecal contamination. Source Molecular has helped researchers for more than 10 years with MST-related projects. The Company provides support with project design as well as sampling materials at no cost. Eligible applicants for the CWA 319 Grants are state agencies, parishes, and local governments; non-government organizations; non-profit organizations; and federally recognized tribal groups within Louisiana. The 319 Nonpoint Source Program may provide up to 60% of the approved workplan cost in any fiscal year. The non-federal costs (40%) must be provided from non-federal sources.

DEADLINE: Contact NPS Program personnel -- Jan.Boydstun@LA.Gov, Gwendolyn.Berthelot@LA.Gov, Christy.Rando@LA.Gov, Reggie.Coleman@LA.Gov -- for details.

Louisiana Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: Louisiana Sea Grant (LSG) seeks to promote interdisciplinary solutions using university research to address complex and often interrelated ecological, economic, and social challenges that affect the state’s adaptation strategies. The magnitude of the challenges in this dynamic, and more recently disturbed, natural and social landscape requires that limited resources available to LSG be distributed utilizing practical and well-defined approaches that are linked to community engagement through our outreach program. Research projects within Louisiana’s coastal region should focus on discovery that integrates knowledge across disciplines that can be applied to one or more of three focus areas of LSG’s Strategic Plan that are eligible for the research competition: 1) Healthy Coastal Ecosystems; 2) Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture and 3) Resilient Communities and Economies. Appropriate activities for Core Research projects include, but are not limited to, field and laboratory studies, computer modeling, archival research, surveys, data analysis, and synthesis. In the case of proposals involving multiple organizations, a single organization must be identified as the lead. LSG encourages Healthy Coastal Ecosystems research with emphasis on, among others, development and sharing of scientific understanding, decision-support tools, technologies and approaches to protect, restore, and improve water quality in Louisiana’s wetlands, rivers, and estuaries.

DEADLINE: Full proposals are due May 22, 2017.


Maine - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Maine Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Maine Sea Grant College Program invites preliminary proposals for research projects to be funded in the period February 2016 through January 2018. Maine Sea Grant is administered by the University of Maine, but the research competition is open to faculty and staff at any public or private research or higher education institution in the state. Project priorities include understanding the effects of human activities and environmental changes on coastal resources, and working to improve ecosystem health; restoring marine habitats and their connections to inland watersheds, and engaging in related research, education, and outreach activities. Non-point source pollution is a concern in Maine's coastal areas. NPS pollution carries various contaminants including fecal matter. Should projects require identification of the sources of fecal pollution in water samples, Source Molecular provides microbial source tracking analysis. MST is a series of scientific methods used to detect the sources that may be contributing to fecal pollution in the environment. Source Molecular offers MST tests that can identify and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. Maine Sea Grant is administered by the University of Maine, but the research competition is open to faculty and staff at any public or private research or higher education institution in the state.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Maine Water Resources Research Grants Program

DESCRIPTION: The Maine - USGS Water Research Resources Institute (a program of the Mitchell Center) administers a grant program as authorized by the federal Water Resources Research Act of 1984 as amended. Funding is uncertain though and is contingent upon inclusion of the Water Resources Research Institute program in the federal budget. Pre-proposals must be related to freshwater resources and focus on developing stakeholder partnerships and interdisciplinary teams that help accelerate progress in understanding and solving sustainability problems. Principal investigators (PI) be faculty or regular staff of a four-year institution of higher education in Maine. Co-investigators are not required to meet this criterion.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.

Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Control Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) through the Nonpoint Source Grants (NPS) Program funds and administers grant projects to prevent or reduce nonpoint source pollutants from entering Maine's water resources. Projects are funded with grant money provided to Maine DEP by the U.S. EPA under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. Eligible projects are those that help communities develop a watershed-based plan to restore NPS-impaired water bodies or to protect water bodies threatened by NPS pollution. One potential cause of water pollution is fecal contamination. For projects that aim to identify sources of fecal contamination, microbial source tracking analysis can be of great help. MST uses genetic markers to interpret data. Some characteristics associated with feces from a particular source allow that type of feces to be identified. Source Molecular's laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Horse, Bird, Elk, Beaver and Ruminant. Maine public organizations such as state agencies, soil and water conservation districts, regional planning agencies, watershed districts, municipalities, and nonprofit (501(c)(3)) organizations are eligible to receive NPS grants. Approximately $800,000 will be available for implementation projects, pending EPA and State approvals and federal budget appropriation. The Department expects to award eight (8) to fourteen (14) grants and reserves the right to make fewer awards. The Department expects a grant award to be in the range of $50,000 to $150,000.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For more information, contact Norman Marcotte, environmental specialist, at 207-215-6277 or norm.g.marcotte@maine.gov.


Maryland - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

319 Nonpoint Source Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) administers the §319(h) Grant Program that provides funds to reduce or eliminate water quality impairments that are associated nonpoint source pollution.  The opportunity for §319(h) funding is offered to local and State entities including county and municipal agencies, Soil Conservation Districts, State agencies and State institutions of higher learning.  Projects may include subcontracts for private firms and nonprofit organizations for consulting, engineering, construction and other tasks.  §319(h) Grant funds can pay for planning, design, construction, monitoring and analysis.  However, the majority of §319(h) Grant funding in Maryland is intended for implementation of projects that will: (a) reduce or eliminate water quality impairments listed in the Maryland’s List of Impaired Water (303(d) List), particularly in watersheds where Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have been approved; and (b) result in quantifiable or measurable improvements in water quality and habitat, including, pollutant load reductions for impairments addressed in TMDLs or identified in the 303(d) List.  Microbial source tracking has been widely used in TMDL development and implementation.  Specifically, researchers have used MST to identify the sources that contribute to the observed impairment, determine which sources are likely the most dominant in the watershed of interest, and focus management actions through targeting implementation and identifying controls that are appropriate and relevant to the identified sources. Source Molecular, which has more than 10 years experience in MST research and development, uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment.

DEADLINE: Currently there is no plan to release a RFP in the near future. For questions, contact Grant Manager Eric Ruby at 410-537-3685 or eruby@mde.state.md.us.

Maryland Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Maryland Sea Grant College (MDSG) funds research projects within Maryland's coasts and watersheds. Projects focused in three areas will be considered: 1) resilient ecosystem process and responses; 2) sustainable fisheries and aquaculture; and 3) resilient communities and economies. Maryland Sea Grant encourages research with emphasis on, among others, rigorous statistical analyses of existing data sets that focus on how coastal ecosystems respond over time to natural forcing, land use changes, and/or specific management actions. These data sets may include time series on ecological properties, water quality, and human activities such as fisheries harvests and loadings from nutrients, sediments, and contaminants. Although MDSG is not focused on efforts to develop new remediation technologies or to support monitoring, MDSG also invites Principal Investigators (PIs) to consider research areas that address developing indicators or models to evaluate and measure ecological or social change/behavior and responses related to Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). Beachwater contamination in Maryland has been reported to come mostly from unknown sources while a small percentage comes from sanitary sewer overflow. Source Molecular has been involved with various water quality-related projects through its microbial source tracking analysis services. Source Molecular is dedicated to helping improve water quality and has analyzed thousands of water samples around the U.S. PIs applying for Maryland Sea Grant funds must be affiliated with an academic institution or research laboratory in Maryland or the District of Columbia. Co-Principal Investigators (Co-PIs) on projects can be from institutions outside of Maryland.

DEADLINE: The application period is closed.

Watershed Assistance Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Chesapeake Bay Trust and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources welcome requests for technical planning and design assistance associated with protection and restoration programs and projects that lead to improved water quality in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed and the Maryland Coastal Bays. The funding partners invite local governments and non-profit organizations to submit requests for this assistance. They want to promote local engagement in the Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) process by pursuing projects that advance the near term goals of the WIPs. The WIP milestones reflect the near-term commitments of Maryland's partners in the collaborative effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay and Maryland's local rivers, lakes and streams.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.


Massachusetts - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

604(b) Water Quality Management Planning Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) will focus 604b grant funds this fiscal year 2016 towards nonpoint source assessment and planning projects. Among others, the MassDEP seeks to determine the nature, extent and causes of water quality problems and assess impacts and determine pollutant loads reductions necessary to meet water quality standards. Microbial source tracking analysis has been used to support bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load development and implementation. Source Molecular has assisted researchers in MST testing as well as project design. Its laboratory offers one of the fastest turnaround times in the industry, providing delivery of its MST analysis results in 5 to 10 working days. Pursuant to Section 604(b) of the Clean Water Act, eligible grant applicants must be either Regional Public Comprehensive Planning Organizations or Interstate Organizations. Eligible entities include regional planning agencies, council of governments, counties, conservation districts, cities and towns, and other substate public planning agencies and interstate agencies.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For inquiries, please contact Gary Gonyea at 617-556-1152 or gary.gonyea@state.ma.us .

Coastal Pollutant Remediation Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs (EEA), through the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM), requests responses for the Coastal Pollutant Remediation Grant Program (CPR). Eligible projects include assessment efforts such as identification of non-point sources of pollution and offering recommendations for controlling or eliminating these sources. Such projects can include the analysis of historical water quality data, water quality testing at in stream and outfall locations, and the development of recommendations for NPS management, as well as the investigation of the appropriate type and placement of stormwater best management practices (BMPs). Eligible projects can also implement BMPs to remediate runoff. Target contaminants include, but are not limited to, bacteria, sediments, nutrients, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Stormwater runoff can pick up pathogens released by leaking and poorly maintained septic systems and discharge them into a storm sewer system or directly to coastal waters. Microbial source tracking methods have recently been used to help identify nonpoint sources responsible for the fecal pollution of water systems. Source Molecular has analyzed thousands of samples and helped hundreds of researchers in MST-related studies. The CPR Grant Program is open to municipalities located within the boundaries of the Massachusetts coastal watershed. CZM expects to award up to $400,000 in total funding for FY 16 CPR projects.

DEADLINE: The currrent grant round is closed. For more information about the CPR Grant Program, contact Adrienne Pappal at adrienne.pappal@state.ma.us or 617-626-1218.

Buzzards Bay Municipal Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Buzzards Bay National Estuary Program, through the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM), administers a municipal grant program that aids towns in testing and treating stormwater discharges, protecting wetlands and wildlife habitat, improving water supplies and safeguarding open spaces. It is funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Grant categories typically include the protection of open space, rare and endangered species habitat, and freshwater and saltwater wetlands, projects to help restore tidally restricted salt marshes, to develop designs and remediate stormwater discharges threatening water quality, to provide support for mapping stormwater drainage networks, to construct pumpout facilities, to digitize wetland boundaries approved in permits, to assist in the monitoring of water quality to prioritize stormwater remediation, to address problems in migratory fish passage, and to implement other recommendations contained in the watershed management plan for Buzzards Bay. Source Molecular uses only the latest scientific laboratory equipment and has highly trained personnel to perform MST analysis.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Massachusetts Environmental Trust General Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Massachusetts Environmental Trust seeks proposals from communities and non-profit organizations for projects that will restore, protect, and improve water and water-related resources of the Commonwealth. The General Grant program provides funding to support programs, research, and other activities that promote the responsible stewardship of the Commonwealth's water resources. Innovative projects that address concerns such as point and non-point source pollution (including runoff, bacterial, chemical, and nutrient); and monitoring marine, estuarine, and freshwater systems are eligible for the General Grants Program. Bacteria polluting waters could include those that indicate fecal contamination. One of the methods used to identify the source of fecal indicator bacteria is microbial source tracking. Source Molecular has been active in the MST industry for more than 10 years. Our laboratory also has the ability to detect fecal contamination from 13 host sources - humans, livestock and wildlife. Effective remediation plans rely heavily on understanding and identifying the source(s) of fecal bacteria.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

MIT Sea Grant College Program

DESCRIPTION: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology was designated as a Sea Grant College in 1970. MIT Sea Grant sponsors a wide variety of marine research, through an annual funding competition open to Massachusetts university-based researchers. The MIT Sea Grant College Program's purpose is to lead in the development of technologies and advances in ocean science in order to contribute to the wise use of marine resources. Coastal issues that are a high priority across Massachusetts include water quality degradation, non-point source pollution, beach closures, etc. Water quality was identified as important for tourism, seafood safety, and aesthetics. The major concerns impacting water quality were run-off and human activities. Fecal matter, most often than not, winds up as part of the contaminants in non-point source pollution. Researchers looking for sources of fecal contamination can look to microbial source tracking for answers. Source Molecular's MST laboratory uses Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) technology to identify the presence of microorganisms in water samples based on the unique genetic sequences. Variations in DNA sequences between living organisms make it possible to distinguish between these organisms through molecular biology techniques. But Core Research Projects for FY2016 will be in the area of ocean acidification.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Section 319 Nonpoint Source Competitive Grants Program

DESCRIPTION: Each year, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Water Resources, in conjunction with the EPA, provides 319 funds for projects that address prevention, control, and abatement of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution, and that attain environmental results by restoring beneficial uses and/or meeting or maintaining state water quality standards. The U.S. EPA defines NPS pollution as that which is "caused by diffuse sources that are not regulated as point sources and are normally associated with precipitation and runoff from the land or percolation." Projects addressing stormwater impacts that are not covered by EPA final NPDES stormwater permits are eligible for funding, provided these projects meet all other 319 eligibility guidelines. Priority will be given to (a) projects in MS4 areas that meet program requirements and will be completed by June 30, 2020; (b) projects of all types that follow or continue work begun under 319, 604b, CZM NPS, MET, NRCS, MassBays, Watershed-Based Plan pilot projects, or other programs; and/or (c) projects that meet one or more objectives of the Massachusetts Nonpoint Source Management Program Plan.

DEADLINE: Responses must be submitted to the Department by June 2, 2017.

Woods Hole Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Woods Hole Sea Grant program, based at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), supports research, education, and extension projects that encourage environmental stewardship, long-term economic development, and responsible use of the nation's coastal and ocean resources. In keeping with the strategic plans of the National Sea Grant College Program (NSGCP) and Woods Hole Sea Grant, the theme areas for 2016 - 2018 are Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture, Resilient Communities and Economies, and Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.



Michigan - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Beach Monitoring Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has approximately $200,000 available for inland beach monitoring under the Clean Michigan Initiative-Clean Water Fund for the fiscal years 2017 and 2018. The goals of the program are to determine levels of bacteria in select bathing beach waters of the state; notify the public of the results; evaluate the effectiveness of state programs in preventing bacterial contamination of surface waters; and develop methods that can differentiate sources of bacterial contamination. Eligible applicants include local county health departments, universities, and non-profit organizations. These grants are meant to fund proposals that determine levels of E. coli in public swimming areas at beaches located on inland lakes and rivers. In selecting projects for grant awards, the DEQ will consider the location and frequency of beach use; the history of beach monitoring; the history of bacterial contamination; access to lab facilities to analyze samples promptly; ability to communicate results to the public in an efficient manner; ability to respond and take appropriate action in an event of beach contamination; the proximity of the beach to known contamination source; the availability of matching funds; the innovativeness and feasibility of the proposed project; and the ability to reduce time delay between sampling and results. Applicants may include the cost of equipment and supplies, sample analysis, and staff needed to implement the water quality monitoring activities. Source Molecular provides genetic testing services on water samples and tells clients the source of the fecal bacteria contamination. Request for Proposals

DEADLINE: Applications must be submitted by February 28, 2017.

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Nonpoint Source Program Grants

DESCRIPTION:
Michigan's Department of Environmental Quality administers a Nonpoint Source (NPS) Program that assists state, federal, and local partners to restore water bodies impaired by NPS pollution and protect high quality waters from impairments caused by NPS pollution. Eligible activities under the Grant Program include addressing NPS pollutants, causes, and sources identified as priorities in watershed management plans. Due to the nature of NPS pollution, source identification is important. If fecal contamination is found in water bodies, microbial source tracking analysis has been used to determine the fecal host. The MST approach is considered an important step towards designing and implementing effective best management practices for controlling fecal pollution. Source Molecular has been actively involved in the research and development of MST techniques. Eligible applicants include state agencies, counties, cities, townships, and villages; regional planning agencies; conservation districts; public and private colleges and universities; and incorporated nonprofit organizations. A total of up to $4.3 million may be available in state and federal funding this Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 for nonpoint source control projects that implement priority recommendations in approved watershed management plans. Due to human health concerns, the NPS Program will allow an exception to the requirements regarding identification of specific locations, BMPs, and site plans for proposals to identify and correct failed or failing on-site wastewater treatment systems.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.

Michigan Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION
: Michigan Sea Grant is accepting proposals for core research projects for the 2018-2020 funding cycle. The projects will run for two years, and the maximum annual research project budget is $100,000 per year, for a total of $200,000, including indirect costs. This does not include required matching funds provided by the Principal Investigator, which should be at least 50% of the amount requested from MISG. This is an open Request for Pre-Proposals (RFP), and university-based researchers are encouraged to submit research projects that fulfill critical research needs for the Great Lakes and coastal ecosystems — and that fit within the focus areas of the Michigan Sea Grant Strategic Plan. Since co-funding opportunities may be available for several topics, MISG is particularly interested in proposals that address: 1) littoral sediment assessment; 2) aquaculture; and 3) assessment of the effects of the Michigan Clean Marina Program’s best management practices on water quality and coastal resources.

DEADLINE:
Proposals are due May 26, 2017.

Michigan Water Center Grants

DESCRIPTION
: The University of Michigan Water Center solicits applications for funding to support and enhance restoration efforts within the Great Lakes basin. Projects should emphasize synthesis and assessment of existing data/information, with little support provided for new data collection. Projects should aim at conducting assessments of economic and/or environmental outcomes for existing Canadian and/or U.S. restoration efforts such as the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI); and/or strengthening Great Lakes restoration projects through enhanced integration of science into restoration efforts that span multiple stressors and/or cover larger geographic areas in the Great Lakes basin; and/or improving restoration and protection science, techniques, and methods for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem. Two tiers of funding are available. Tier I projects will be funded up to $50,000 (USD) over two years. Tier II projects will be funded up to $500,000 (USD) over two years. These projects could potentially include microbial source tracking analysis if fecal pollution is suspected during restoration efforts. Source Molecular uses scientifically rigorous genetic and molecular analytical methods that enable it to identify with high confidence sources of microbial contamination. Source Molecular uses a 27-step DNA extraction kit in conducting MST analysis of water samples to avoid false negative results. Project teams must be led by a principal investigator (PI) from a U.S. or Canadian academic institution. Individual citizens, federal agency personnel, or individuals from not-for-profit or private for-profit firms may be integrated as team members, but cannot serve as lead principal investigators.

DEADLINE:
The current application period is closed.



Minnesota - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Clean Water Fund Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources provides funding to local units of government to deliver soil and water conservation services to their communities. The Clean Water Fund was established with the purpose of protecting, enhancing, and restoring water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams in addition to protecting ground water and drinking water sources from degradation. These grants are for partnerships of eligible local groups to use a systematic, science-based approach to watershed management to develop plans that provide the greatest environmental benefits to each watershed. Eligible activities must be consistent with a watershed management plan that has been state approved and locally adopted or an approved total maximum daily load study (TMDL), Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategy (WRAPS), surface water intake plan, or well head protection plan. Microbial source tracking analysis could be a potential activity under projects related to TMDL. Source Molecular provides MST analysis using the latest scientific laboratory equipment and analytical methods that enable it to identify with high confidence sources of microbial contamination. Eligible applicants are local government units. Partner organizations such as non-profits, watershed groups, school districts or lake associations must work in conjunction with eligible applicants.

DEADLINE:
Proposals are due April 19, 2017.

Clean Water Partnership Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) provides financial and technical assistance to local government and other water resource managers to address nonpoint source water pollution through the State Clean Water Partnership (CWP) and Federal Clean Water Act Section 319 (Section 319) programs. The Clean Water Partnership program is now accepting applications from local governmental units interested in leading a nonpoint source pollution control project for protection or restoration of Minnesota's water bodies. Eligible project activities include water quality monitoring. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular uses a 27-step DNA extraction kit in conducting MST analysis of water samples to avoid false negative results.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Section 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) provides financial and technical assistance to local government and other water resource managers to address nonpoint source water pollution through the State Clean Water Partnership (CWP) and Federal Clean Water Act Section 319 (Section 319) programs. Section 319 projects are implementation-oriented and must offer a means of moving towards a resolution of the non-point source pollution problems identified as part of the project. Section 319 projects can address the implementation of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) to address impaired waters. Section 319 is open to all entities except federal agencies.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Minnesota Sea Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The University of Minnesota Sea Grant College Program solicits proposals for projects that match its national and state strategic initiatives. Focus areas related to NOAA Sea Grant priorities are Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Resilient Communities and Economies. The goals of the Program are to create, generate, and disseminate scientific information supporting ecosystem-based approaches to managing the coastal environment in Minnesota; to assist in generating a sustainable supply of safe foods and other products from aquatic environs for commercial harvest, aquaculture, and recreational fisheries; and to foster sustainable, resilient, and thriving coastal communities that successfully balance economic development and environmental protection while preparing for threats and hazards. Threats to water quality could include fecal contamination. If there's a need to identify the source of the waste matter, microbial source tracking analysis is a useful tool. Source Molecular specializes in real-time qPCR microbial source tracking and its laboratory can detect and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.

Surface Water Assessment Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) is responsible for monitoring the quality of Minnesota’s waters and determining whether they meet their designated uses, such as swimming and fishing.  It awards Surface Water Assessment Grants to projects that monitor the physical, chemical and/or bacteriological water quality parameters of lakes or streams to determine their condition.  Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes.  In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue.  Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible.  Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development.  Eligible applicants for Surface Water Assessment Grants include local and regional units of government, tribes, nonprofits, educational institutions and watershed management organizations or districts in Minnesota.

DEADLINE:
The application period for 2013 Surface Water Assessment Grants has closed.

Watershed Pollutant Load Monitoring Network Sampling Grants


DESCRIPTION:
The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) awards Watershed Pollutant Load Monitoring Network Sampling Grants to projects specific to monitoring the physical and chemical water quality parameters of streams primarily during events (i.e., snowmelt or rain events) when watershed runoff is high to determine contaminant concentrations from the watershed, with a smaller percentage of sampling to measure base flow conditions. Fecal bacteria are often carried away with runoff. Determining the source of fecal bacteria is important in order to craft plans and policies to successfully address the pollution. Microbial source tracking makes identification of fecal source contamination possible. Source Molecular's laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts, a capability that comes in very handy since fecal bacteria in runoff can come from multiple sources. Eligible applicants for Watershed Pollutant Load Monitoring Network Sampling Grants include local and regional units of government, tribes, non-profits, educational institutions and watershed management organizations or districts in Minnesota.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.


Mississippi - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC) is accepting one- or two-year pre-proposals to address coastal issues in Alabama and Mississippi through translational and innovative research. Pre-proposals are expected to focus on research and be highly integrated, multidisciplinary and address one or more of the research priorities in three focus areas: Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Resilient Communities and Economies.

DEADLINE: Full proposals are due June 9, 2017.

Stewardship Fund Program Planning Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Mississippi Watershed Management Organization provides Stewardship Fund Program Planning Grants for up to $10,000. The Stewardship Fund Grants assist public efforts to protect and improve shared water resources so everyone can have clean water. Planning Grants are intended to assist organizations to plan and prepare documentation for a project that will be implemented in the near future. Planning Grants help fund the planning process for detailed projects that help improve water quality through construction, education, outreach or other ways. Eligible applicants are non-profit community or faith-based organizations, officially recognized neighborhood groups, business and professional associations, schools and local units of government.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For questions or more information, please contact Marcy Bean, Program Specialist, at 612-746-4979 or mbean@mwmo.org.

Stewardship Fund Program Action Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Mississippi Watershed Management Organization provides Stewardship Fund Program Action Grants for up to $50,000 each annually to complete a significant watershed stewardship project. Eligible Action Grant projects may reduce pollution entering surface and groundwater, and should educate and engage people in the watershed regarding its issues, resulting in awareness and changed behaviors. The EPA has observed that a significant portion of monitored surface waters contains fecal bacterial densities that exceed the levels established by state surface water quality standards. Reducing fecal pollution levels in natural water systems is particularly challenging as in most cases non-point sources of pollution are the primary contributors to high fecal bacterial levels. A variety of microbial source tracking methods is used to determine the identification of fecal pollution sources. Many institutions and agencies have relied on Source Molecular's team of scientists and business professionals, who are dedicated to providing the best service and most accurate MST results. Nonprofit organizations, officially recognized neighborhood groups, schools, local units of government, and business and professional associations are eligible to apply for Action Grants.

DEADLINE: Full applications are due January 13, 2017. For more information, please contact Marcy Bean, Program Specialist, at 612-746-4979 or mbean@mwmo.org.

Section 319 Funding

DESCRIPTION: The Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality's Nonpoint Source Management Program is dedicated to protecting and restoring Mississippi's water resources. The Program supports a wide variety of nonpoint source (NPS) or polluted runoff technical assistance, environmental education and training, technology transfer, demonstration and monitoring projects, and wetland restoration.  It provides financial assistance to other state agencies, local governments, universities, and non-profit organizations to implement these NPS projects through the Clean Water Act's Section 319 Grant. NPS pollution has been identified as the primary contributor to high fecal bacteria levels in surface waters.  Microbial source tracking methods have been used to help identify nonpoint sources responsible for the fecal pollution of water systems.  Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in the MST industry.  Its laboratory can detect and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant.  The NPS Program receives approximately $4.5 million per grant year and all projects must supply a 60:40 (319:project) dollar match.

DEADLINE: Due to the State's limited funding resources, it is not always able to fund every NPS project. For additional information, NPS Program Coordinator Dahmash, Zoffee can be reached through telephone at 601-961-5137.


Missouri - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

Section 319 Nonpoint Source Major Subgrants

DESCRIPTION: The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has funding available to assist organizations with implementing best management practices and associated activities in their department-accepted watershed management plan. The purpose of the funding is to implement on-the-ground practices that control, reduce or manage nonpoint source pollution as described in the Missouri Nonpoint Source Management Plan and active Request for Proposals. Funding is authorized by Section 319 of the Clean Water Act and provided by the U.S. EPA through the Department of Natural Resources to address nonpoint source water pollution, such as polluted runoff from unregulated or unpermitted sources and in waters needing improvements or protection from further degradation. Priority will be given to projects to be conducted at pilot watersheds including Lower Grand River, Big River, and Spring River basins; and projects that eliminate NPS impairments and/or restore NPS impaired waters identified in TMDL reports and state-accepted watershed based plans. Water quality monitoring is an eligible component. Source Molecular has a vast experience in helping researchers with water quality monitoring projects particularly in the area of microbial source tracking where identification of the source of fecal contamination in water systems is the key for effective remediation plans. Grants are available to public institutions of higher education, units or sub-units of government, and non-profit organizations with demonstrated 501(c)(3) status.

DEADLINE: The application deadline has passed. For more information, contact Greg Anderson, Nonpoint Source Coordinator of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, via telephone at 573-751-7428 or email at greg.anderson@dnr.mo.gov.


Montana - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

319 Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) solicits project proposals from eligible applicants to further Montana's NPS Program goals. The DEQ issues a Call for Grant Applications every year under Section 319(h) of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA). Section 319(h) funds for projects are distributed competitively to support the most effective and highest priority projects. The primary goal of the 319 program is to restore water quality in water bodies whose beneficial uses are impaired by nonpoint source pollution and whose water quality does not meet state standards. To be eligible, all projects must address nonpoint source pollution; and address impairments identified on Montana's 2012 List of Impaired Waters; and implement goals and objectives identified in the 2012 Montana Nonpoint Source Management Plan; and directly implement projects or activities identified in a DEQ-accepted Watershed Restoration Plan. Applicants must be either a governmental entity or a nonprofit organization. NPS pollution is widespread and can bring various contaminants in a water body, including fecal matter. Microbial source tracking can determine sources of fecal contamination because this method uses real-time PCR technology, which simultaneously amplifies and detects the DNA of fecal indicator organisms in water. Source Molecular works with individuals involved with surface water run-off, groundwater remediation/protection, surface water quality, bacterial/microbial/fecal source tracking, and causes of water pollution (including point and non-point sources).

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.


Nebraska - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Nonpoint Source Water Quality Grants (Section 319)

DESCRIPTION: The Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) is inviting proposals for funding under the Nebraska Nonpoint Source Pollution Management Program authorized through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act as administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The state NPS Management Program seeks to protect public health and existing water uses, prevent water quality degradation caused by NPS pollution, and improve water quality degraded by NPS pollution to the extent feasible. The NDEQ is prioritizing projects which will develop implementable 9-element watershed management or 9-element groundwater management plans. Other types of projects will be considered, but developing plans is an agency priority. Nonpoint source issues in Nebraska include septic tanks and animal waste from livestock operations. Septic systems and water supply wells are often in close proximity to each other. The primary concern in these areas is the potential human health impact of having sewage sources near drinking water sources. Location and construction of waste lagoons and land application of manure as a fertilizer source are primary concerns. Depending on the location, these concerns may involve either ground or surface water quality. Projects must address these NPS concerns.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. Please direct questions via e-mail to: NDEQ.NonPointSource@nebraska.gov.


Nevada - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

CWA 319(h) Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) 319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant Program provides funds to qualifying counties, conservation districts, higher education, regional agencies, and nonprofit organizations that conduct projects aiming to improve water quality, to educate Nevada's citizens about nonpoint source pollution, to implement projects from an approved watershed implementation plan, and implement Best Management Practices to protect water quality. The NDEP has approximately $1 million in federal funding available to provide grant assistance for projects that prevent or control nonpoint source water pollution, the leading cause of water quality impairment in Nevada. Source Molecular has been involved with numerous NPS-related projects. It provides assistance to researchers who need microbial source tracking (MST) services. MST is used when there's a need to determine the source of fecal pollution in water bodies.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For any questions or more information, please contact Birgit Widegren, Supervisor, Nonpoint Source Program, Bureau of Water Quality Planning, Nevada Division of Environmental Protection at 775-687-9550 or bwidegren@ndep.nv.gov.


New Hampshire - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

New Hampshire Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: New Hampshire Sea Grant seeks pre-proposals for its next funding cycle, February 1, 2018 to January 31, 2020. Every two years, N.H. Sea Grant issues an RFP for its Omnibus Proposal for those seeking major funding for research projects. During 2017, the program will be reviewing proposals from investigators for one or two-year research funding during 2018-2020. The N.H. Sea Grant Program’s Strategic Plan’s Focus Areas are: Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture; Healthy Coastal Ecosystems; Resilient Communities and Economies; and Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development. The N.H. Sea Grant Program encourages proposals to address the need for Safe and Sustainable Seafood Production through responsible stewardship of healthy coastal ecosystems that balances ecosystem services and helps communities maintain working waterfronts and coastal economies. Achieving progress will require innovative biophysical, socio-economical and engineering research. High quality proposals that do not focus on this theme, but on other Focus Areas outlined in the current strategic plan will also be considered.

DEADLINE: Full proposals are due on June 2, 2017.

Watershed Assistance Grants

DESCRIPTION: The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services is accepting proposals for Watershed Assistance Grants to support local initiatives to restore impaired waters or protect high quality waters. Eligible applicants include municipalities, non-profit organizations, state agencies, regional planning commission, and county conservation districts. Watershed Assistance Grants must address specific water quality problems and result in quantifiable water quality improvement. All projects must address watershed restoration or protection goals in high priority watersheds as identified in the New Hampshire Nonpoint Source Management Program Plan. Microbial source tracking has been used in NPS-related studies to identify sources of fecal contamination. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For more information, call Coastal Watershed contact: Sally Soule at (603)559-0032 or sally.soule@des.nh.gov; Merrimack Watershed contact: Steve Landry at (603)271-2969 or stephen.landry@des.nh.gov; and Saco, Connecticut, and Androscoggin watersheds contact: Jeff Marcoux at (603)271-8862 or jeffrey.marcoux@des.nh.gov.

Water Quality Planning 604(B) Funding

DESCRIPTION: The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) is requesting Letters of Intent (LOI) from Regional Planning Commissions (RPCs) and the Connecticut River Joint Commissions (CRJC) for potential 2017-2018 Section 604(b) Water Quality Planning projects. The LOI will be used to select projects warranting further development. Section 604(b) of the Clean Water Act requires funds to be allocated to regional planning entities for conducting water quality planning, including determining the nature, extent, and causes of water quality problems in the State. Other eligible projects that address the above water quality concerns may include but are not limited to conducting monitoring to address specific water quality concerns. A total amount of $54,000 is available for calendar year 2017, with at least $40,000 expected for calendar year 2018. NHDES anticipates funding between one to three projects with the available funding over the next two years. Applicants are encouraged to leverage 604(b) grant funds with local funding, in-kind services, and other forms of match to generate effective project budgets.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.


New Jersey - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.

New Jersey Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: The New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium (NJSGC) is one of 34 state Sea Grant Programs within the National Sea Grant College Program. NJSGC's mission is to promote the sustainable use of New Jersey's coastal and marine resources through relevant research and student training, educational excellence, and rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge. Research priorities include developing and assessing tools and techniques of newly-developed stormwater BMPs that communities can use to reduce stormwater impacts to bays, back-bays, coastal lakes and lagoonal systems in regards to nitrogen reduction, water quality, chemical contaminants, stormwater retention, algal blooms, and/or green infrastructure. Principal Investigators must be affiliated with a university, a two (2) or four (4) year college, museum, research laboratory or other non-profit institution in the State of New Jersey.

DEADLINE: Full Proposals are due June 5, 2017.

Section 319(h) NPS Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The State of New Jersey utilizes a variety of funds for various Nonpoint Source Pollution activities. A portion of the annual funds are provided under Section 319(h) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection must award at least 50% of the annual federal 319(h) grant to projects that implement approved watershed-based plans and approved Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). The remainder of the pass-through amount can be used for additional NPS-related projects. The Department is soliciting for water quality projects that address one or more of the identified impairments in Hydrologic Unit Codes (HUCs). One of the impairments identified in the HUCs is E.coli. Source Molecular can help in projects requiring testing to detect the sources of E.coli. Its laboratory can detect and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources (Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant). Correctly identifying the source of fecal pollution is integral in crafting plans to reduce the contamination.

DEADLINE:Proposals are due May 4, 2017.

Water Quality Management Planning Pass-Through Grant (604 Grants)

DESCRIPTION:
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides grants for conducting wastewater management planning activities and developing management plans for on-site wastewater treatment systems. The State of New Jersey receives funds under Section 604(b) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 (commonly referred to as the federal Clean Water Act), to carry out water quality management planning activities under Sections 205(j) and 303 (e) of the Act. For SFY 2013, projects that continue the development of wastewater management plans will be prioritized. Plan components that will be considered for funding include Septic Management Plans. New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Coastal and Land Use Planning, pointed to failing or poorly maintained individual subsurface sewage disposal systems as possible contributors of various pollutants, including pathogens such as fecal coliform in both surface and ground waters. Microbial source tracking analysis allows researchers to determine the source of fecal pollution in water bodies. In MST analysis, Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. Its laboratory's quality of service has been recognized with its pending ISO 17025 accreditation. Eligible applicants for 604 Grants are water quality management planning agencies and other regional public comprehensive planning organizations (RPCPOs) such as the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, designated areawide water quality management planning agencies, counties and in some cases municipalities.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


New Mexico - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

On-The-Ground (OTG) Surface Water Quality Improvement Projects

DESCRIPTION: The New Mexico Environment Department receives funds under Section 319(h) of the Clean Water Act and uses it to implement on-the-ground projects in the watersheds of priority impaired stream reaches to produce measurable improvements in water quality. The Department seeks to establish Memoranda of Agreement (MOAs) or Contracts for projects in the watersheds of priority impaired stream reaches to produce measurable improvement in water quality by 2020 and also in the longer term. Projects must address specific impaired waters identified in the 2016-2018 State of New Mexico CWA 303(d)/305(b) Integrated Report. Only those waters having completed WBPs, and a limited category of waters with similar planning complete (Category 4B waters), are eligible. Eligible applicants include citizen watershed groups, non-profit organizations, for-profit organizations, individuals, and federal, state and local agencies (including those of Indian Nations, Pueblos, and Tribes).

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.

Watershed Based Planning (WBP) Projects

DESCRIPTION: The Surface Water Quality Bureau of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) seeks to develop planning projects within watersheds of specified priority stream reaches to meet the requirements of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Nonpoint Source Program and Grants Guidelines for States and Territories (Fed. Reg., October 23, 2003). These Guidelines require that a watershed-based plan be complete before incremental Clean Water Act Section 319 funds may be used to implement water quality improvement projects within those watersheds. Watershed-based planning projects must focus on development of Watershed Based Plans (WBPs) that characterize watersheds and identify causes and sources of water quality impairments; set goals and identify solutions that include management measures to address the impairments; outline implementation and monitoring programs; and provide estimates of expected reductions in pollutant loading following implementation. Threats to water quality could include fecal contamination. If there's a need to identify the source of the waste matter, microbial source tracking analysis is a useful tool. Source Molecular specializes in real-time qPCR microbial source tracking and its laboratory can detect and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources. Eligible applicants include citizen watershed groups, non-profit organizations, for-profit organizations, individuals, and federal, state and local agencies (including those of Indian Nations, Pueblos, and Tribes).

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For more information, contact Program Manager Abe Franklin at Abraham.Franklin@state.nm.us or (505) 827-2793.


New York - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Long Island Sound Futures Fund

DESCRIPTION: The Long Island Sound Futures Fund (Futures Fund) is soliciting proposals to achieve clean water and healthy watersheds, restore habitats and abundant wildlife, and enhance public education and participation for Long Island Sound. The Futures Fund grant program is administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) in collaboration with and with support from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Long Island Sound Study (LISS), and US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Among the program priorities is Clean Water and Healthy Watersheds, which includes monitoring water quality of the Sound or its embayments. Monitoring must be related to an impaired waterbody as designated under the Clean Water Act, Section 305(b) in Connecticut and New York; and the monitoring must demonstrate that data collected will used to address use impairments (i.e., reduce annual beach-day closures, open closed shellfish beds etc.). Approximately $20,000 to $65,000 in Planning and Water Quality Monitoring Grants may be awarded to water quality monitoring projects. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. Eligible applicants for the Long Island Sound Futures Fund include non-profit 501(c) organizations; state, tribal, and local governments; and academic and educational institutions.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

New York Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: New York Sea Grant (NYSG) is part of a national Sea Grant network. It is a cooperative program of the State University of New York (SUNY) and Cornell University. NYSG supports hypothesis-based research related to marine, Hudson estuary, and Great Lakes topics and issues. NYSG invites projects that will advance the Goals listed in New York Sea Grant's Strategic Plan for 2014-2017. One of the goals is to improve coastal water quality through community efforts. In particular, NYSG is looking for research to develop techniques and tools to better assess coastal water quality, water quality impairments (including emerging contaminants). New York Sea Grant also has limited funds each year that are available to support special funding requests. Water quality monitoring projects could potentially include microbial source tracking analysis if fecal pollution is suspected. MST methods are used to identify the source of fecal pollution. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development. Faculty at academic institutions are the main targets and recipients of NYSG's research funds. Nevertheless, proposals from other groups may be accepted and approved for funding, too.

DEADLINE: Proposals for the biennial research grants are no longer accepted for this year. Special Funding Requests are considered throughout the year.

Water Quality Improvement Project Program

DESCRIPTION: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) administers the Water Quality Improvement Project (WQIP) program, which is a competitive, statewide reimbursement grant program open to local governments and not-for-profit corporations for projects that directly address documented water quality impairments. Funding for the program is primarily from the New York State Environmental Protection Fund (EPF). To be eligible to receive a grant, a project must address a documented water quality impact or threat. Projects that significantly address precluded or impaired waterbodies, as listed in the Waterbody Inventory/Priority Waterbodies List, are the highest priority and will receive a higher numeric score in the evaluation. Funding for WQIP Round 12 is being made available through Governor Cuomo's REDC initiative that started in 2012. Grants awarded through the WQIP program can fund up to 85% of the total project cost for wastewater treatment improvement projects. Grant recipients may receive up to 75% of the total project cost for non-agricultural nonpoint source abatement and control, aquatic habitat restoration, municipal separate storm sewer system projects.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For further information, please contact Susan Van Patten or Jeremy Campbell at the NY DEC Division of Water at (518) 402-8179.


North Carolina - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

205(j) Water Quality Management Planning Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources Division of Water Quality administers the 205(j) Grant Program, which is a federally funded program by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under Sections 604(b) and 205(j) of the Clean Water Act. The funds are to be used to determine the nature, extent and causes of point and nonpoint source pollution problems and to develop plans to resolve these problems. Among others, 2013 Priorities identified include projects that identify the causes and sources or groups of sources that will need to be controlled to achieve pollutant load reductions estimated in the watershed and projects with a monitoring component to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation efforts over time measured against the criteria established to measure achieved pollutant load reductions. High levels of fecal-indicator bacteria have been found in North Carolina's rivers, streams and creeks. Identifying the sources of fecal contamination would be helpful in crafting solutions to address this problem. Microbial Source Tracking has been widely used to determine sources of fecal pollution in water samples. Source Molecular provides MST tests that can identify and quantify fecal contamination from 13 host sources -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Beaver, Bird and Ruminant. Limited competitive funding is available to regional Councils of Government (COGs) for water quality management planning efforts. For FY2013, $97,200 of funding is available.

DEADLINE:
The application period is closed.

Clean Water Act Section 319(h) Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources (DWR) administers funding and oversight of proposals from government agencies and nonprofit organizations to address nonpoint sources of pollution in the state. Eligible projects will be those that implement a DWR-approved watershed restoration plan to restore the water quality of impaired waters. The purpose of the funding is to restore waters impaired at least in part by nonpoint source (NPS) pollution. NPS impaired waters are those monitored by the state or other entities in which designated allowable uses such as aquatic life, fishing, swimming or shellfish harvesting have been limited or prohibited due to exceedance of a water quality standard. All selected projects that include a monitoring component shall provide a Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) to be reviewed and approved by DWR prior to the release of funds for monitoring activities. Source Molecular is familiar with the development of QAPPs as it has assisted numerous government agencies with such plans in line with the agencies' goal to identify the source of fecal contamination in water bodies. Applicants eligible to apply for and receive 319 funds are state and local governments (including Councils of Government); interstate and intrastate agencies; and public and private nonprofit organizations and institutions (including academic institutions).

DEADLINE:
The current deadline has passed.

Clean Water Management Trust Fund Restoration/Stormwater Project Grants

DESCRIPTION:
North Carolina's Clean Water Management Trust Fund (CWMTF) receives money from the General Assembly in order to issue grants to local governments, state agencies and conservation non-profits to help finance projects that specifically address water pollution problems. One of the Annual Competitive Cycle Grants administered by CWMTF is on Restoration and Stormwater Projects. Funds for stormwater quality projects should be used for water quality improvement and protection. Pathogens were identified as the number one cause of impairment in North Carolina's 303(d) Listed Waters in 2010. These pathogens could include fecal indicator bacteria. In determining the source of fecal contamination in water bodies, microbial source tracking analysis has been shown to produce highly accurate results. Source Molecular, which has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development, has a laboratory that can detect 13 different fecal pollution host sources. CWMTF will not provide funds for water quality monitoring. However, water quality monitoring may be allowed as matching contributions to the project. In order to qualify as match, the water quality monitoring must be directly targeted at documenting improvements in water quality as a result of the proposed project.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.

North Carolina Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION:
North Carolina Sea Grant has initiated a request for proposal (RFP) process for the 2018–2020 Omnibus Funding Cycle, which runs from February 1, 2018, through January 31, 2020. The National Sea Grant College Program strives to fund applied research within four focus areas: 1) Healthy Coastal Ecosystems; 2) Resilient Communities and Economies; 3) Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture; and 4) Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development. Proposed work must clearly align with one or more of these focus areas, be based within North Carolina, and target issues important to North Carolina’s coastal region. Coastal development, current land-use practices and other human activities are contributing to water-quality degradation and human health impacts, as well as decline of aquatic and terrestrial habitat for fish and other species, wetlands loss, and proliferation of invasive species.

DEADLINE:
Deadline for full proposals is May 8, 2017.


North Dakota - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Section 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The North Dakota Department of Health's Division of Water Quality administers a Nonpoint Source Pollution Management Program Plan. The North Dakota NPS Program mission is to protect or restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the waters of the state by promoting locally sponsored, incentive based, voluntary programs where those waters are threatened or impaired due to nonpoint sources of pollution. Given the size of the agricultural industry in North Dakota, a majority of the Section 319 funds awarded to the state have been directed toward locally sponsored projects promoting voluntary NPS pollution control on agricultural lands. These funds have been used to support various educational activities and provide financial and technical assistance to landowners implementing best management practices (BMP). As a foundation for these efforts, a portion of the Section 319 budget is also used to support watershed assessments that are designed to evaluate existing water quality conditions and identify the sources and causes of any NPS pollutants impairing beneficial uses. Fecal matter is a possible pollutant brought about by nonpoint sources. Microbial source tracking is a useful tool in identifying the fecal source. Source Molecular's laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant.

DEADLINE:
Draft project proposals are usually due every August 1 while final project proposals are usually due every November 1. Awards and issuance of funds usually happen between March and April. For additional information, contact NPS Coordinator Greg Sandness via telephone at (701) 328-5232 or via email at gsandnes@nd.gov.


Ohio - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Ohio Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION:
The Ohio Sea Grant College Program is requesting pre-proposals for one- to two-year research projects on Great Lakes issues with particular significance to Ohio, Lake Erie, the Great Lakes region and the nation. Approximately $425,000 is available in each project year (February 1, 2016 to January 31, 2017 and February 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018); approximately seven $60,000 projects will be funded in this grant cycle. Ohio Sea Grant's 2014-2018 strategic plan seeks to improve the economy, education and the environment using research, education and outreach in partnership with government, academia and the private sector. The plan is built to guide its implementation of the National Sea Grant Program strategic plan and its focus areas Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture, Resilient Communities and Economies, and Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development. Any proposal that addresses the strategic plan will be considered. However, priority in the 2014 to 2018 funding cycle will be given to projects that focus on issues of nutrient loading to Lake Erie and harmful algal blooms or coastal economic development.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.

Section 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is soliciting proposals for grants awarded under Section 319(h) of the Clean Water Act. Proposed projects must be consistent with recommended actions within an approved Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) report or a state-endorsed watershed action plan. Request for Proposals FY2017 Section 319 Grants. Eligible applicants include local municipalities, counties and townships; county and municipal park districts; soil & water conservation districts; 501(c)(3) nonprofit conservation and watershed organizations; watershed groups with local government sponsorship; and state agencies with land management responsibilities.

DEADLINE:
The current deadline has passed.

Surface Water Improvement Fund Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Ohio EPA solicits proposals for grants awarded from the Surface Water Improvement Fund (SWIF). Grants up to $150,000 each are awarded to various local organizations for the implementation of specific projects that address nonpoint source pollution and/or storm water runoff and result in water quality improvements in Ohio's streams, rivers and lakes. Grants are awarded for a two year term. Water quality improvement projects eligible for SWIF grant funding include stream restoration and re-naturalization; wetland restoration and protection; inland lake management and restoration, among others. Microbial source tracking could be a useful tool in restoration and protection of water systems if fecal contamination is detected or suspected. The EPA's 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria (RWQC) acknowledged that MST may be useful in verifying the results of sanitary surveys by confirming the presumed sources of fecal contamination in the watershed. Source Molecular has a team of scientists and business professionals, who are dedicated to providing the best service and most accurate MST results. Eligible applicants for SWIF Grants include local municipalities, counties and townships; county and municipal park districts; soil & water conservation districts; 501(c)(3) nonprofit conservation groups with land management responsibilities; watershed groups (with local government sponsorship); and state agencies with land managing responsibilities.

DEADLINE:
The current application period is closed.


Oklahoma - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Oklahoma Water Resources Board has funds available under its Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) Grants for cities or towns with a population of 7000 or less. Cities and towns with lesser population or a "relatively weaker fiscal capacity" have higher priority. Projects eligible for REAP grant funding include sewer line construction or repair and related storm or sanitary sewer projects, water line construction or repair, water treatment, and distribution or recovery and related projects. Economic development grants may also include improvements in rural water quality, rural solid waste disposal or treatment, rural sanitary sewer construction or upgrades. Microbial source tracking could be a possible component of a water quality related project. MST can detect fecal contamination in water systems. If human is the source of contamination, leaking sewer pipes might be the cause and might need to be repaired. Source Molecular has performed thousands of MST tests in the past 10 years using the latest scientific laboratory equipment and analytical methods that enable it to identify with high confidence sources of microbial contamination. Eligible applicants for the REAP Grants include counties, towns and municipalities, public works authorities, school districts, rural water districts, water conservancy districts, rural sewage districts, and irrigation districts.

DEADLINE:
Completed REAP applications must be received by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board by 5:00 p.m. on the first business day of September for potential funding from the following Fiscal Year appropriations.



Oregon - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Nonpoint Source Implementation 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality administers the federal Nonpoint Source Implementation 319 Program in Oregon. This program provides federal grant funds under the Clean Water Act's Section 319(h) to address nonpoint source water pollution issues. Projects given priority include water quality monitoring and pollutant source characterization projects; TMDL implementation monitoring; addressing higher risk non-point source potential contamination within sensitive areas; among others. Microbial source tracking has been widely used in TMDL development and implementation. Specifically, researchers used MST to identify the sources that contribute to the observed impairment, determine which sources are likely the most dominant in the watershed of interest, and focus management actions through targeting implementation and identifying controls that are appropriate and relevant to the identified sources. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. Governmental agencies and non-profit organizations are eligible to receive 319 Grants. Other groups may also apply by partnering with municipalities; non-profit organizations, county conservation districts, watershed; councils and associations; water suppliers; state agencies and universities; tribal nations; and regional planning commissions.

DEADLINE:
Proposals are due by May 26, 2017.

Oregon Governor's Fund for the Environment

DESCRIPTION:
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (Foundation) uses funds from a settlement with an international shipping company that was charged with violating numerous federal pollution laws.  The Foundation used the $2,000,000 in community service payments that the courts ordered to establish the Oregon Governor’s Fund for the Environment (the Fund) to receive monies and to administer an annual grant program to finance conservation projects.  Eligible projects include those that would develop and implement strategies to eliminate and/or reduce pollution and otherwise restore the quality of Oregon rivers, streams and coastal areas; and identify continuing sources of pollution of Oregon rivers, streams and coastal areas.  Beginning in 2012, the Fund will be focused on the long-term conservation of the state’s wild salmon strongholds.  NFWF is inviting pre-proposals requesting up to $75,000 in grant funds to support, among others, projects that maintain or improve water quality. Funds can also support monitoring components of habitat protection and restoration projects. Researchers have used microbial source tracking to identify the sources that contribute to fecal contamination, determine which sources are likely the most dominant in the watershed of interest, and focus management actions through targeting implementation and identifying controls that are appropriate and relevant to the identified sources. Source Molecular, which has more than 10 years experience in MST research and development, uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment.  Eligible applicants for the Oregon Governor’s Fund for the Environment include 501(c)3 registered non-profit organizations; local, state or federal government agencies; tribes; educational institutions; and watershed councils, soil and water conservation districts, and other special districts.

DEADLINE:
The application period for the current grant year is closed.

Oregon Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION:
The Oregon Sea Grant Program is looking for the best science and an innovative approach to a well-defined coastal or marine problem or opportunity that is important to Oregon, the Pacific Northwest Region, and the nation. Numerous rivers and streams drain nearly all water from Oregon's 15 major watersheds into the Pacific Ocean. There are 22 major estuaries along the Oregon coast. Oregon Sea Grant seeks, among others, to improve water quality of nearshore and estuarine systems. It will explore opportunities to enhance its activities around contaminants of emerging concern in surface and groundwater. One of the primary concerns in coastal communities is beach contamination. Fecal contamination is a valid issue that needs to be addressed as it can be carried over by non-point sources such as runoff or it can directly come from animals living or loitering near coastal areas. To determine the host of fecal bacteria found in water samples, many researchers have turned to microbial source tracking. MST analysis has been found to produce accurate results. Source Molecular has assisted numerous MST-related projects in its more than 10 years in the industry. Source Molecular provides unlimited assistance to clients in crafting appropriate sampling and MST plans. Proposals for the Oregon Sea Grant may be submitted by faculty of any public or private institution of higher education. While non-academic researchers may be included among the investigators, awards will be made only through colleges and universities.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.

[LOAN] Oregon's Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF)

DESCRIPTION:
The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers Oregon's Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) program, which offers below-market interest rate loans and bond purchases to public agencies for, among others, planning or implementation of water quality improvement projects related to wastewater collection, treatment, water reuse and disposal systems; and non-point source water pollution control projects. CWSRF loans are available to public agencies including cities, counties, tribal governments, sewer and sanitary districts, various special districts, soil and water conservation districts, and irrigation districts. Eligible projects include stormwater projects under certain circumstances, source water projection, monitoring, data collection and measurement, analysis, etc. leading to a written plan. Latest copy of the Intended Use Plan for Oregon's CWSRF program.

DEADLINE:
The current loan application period is closed.



Pennsylvania - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

1675 Foundation Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The 1675 Foundation is one of four Ware family foundations created in 2004. Its mission is to fortify the key elements of a healthy community, which include the environment. Among the efforts the Foundation supports are land and water conservation and preservation. With regards to projects involving water conservation and preservation, water quality monitoring could be a component and it could potentially include microbial source tracking analysis if fecal pollution is suspected. Source Molecular has been providing MST services for more than 10 years and has helped hundreds of researchers with their MST-related projects. Eligible applicants for 1675 Foundation Grants include organizations that are tax exempt under the IRS Code 501 (c)(3) as well as public charities under IRS Code 509(a). Grants are made to organizations that serve Chester County, Pennsylvania. Grants range from $2,000 to $50,000 and are made twice a year at the discretion of the Trustees. Grants are made on an annual basis: organizations may apply only once within a twelve month period. Multi-year grants are awarded occasionally.

DEADLINE:
Complete applications are considered at meetings that are usually scheduled for December and May. Applications must be postmarked by March 1 for consideration at the May distribution meeting or by October 1 for consideration at the December distribution meeting. For more information, please call 610-896-3868 or e-mail Marge Brennan, Grants Manager, at mbrennan@1675foundation.org.

Coastal Resources Management

DESCRIPTION: Pennsylvania's Coastal Resources Management Program (CRMP) offers a competitive grant program that administers funding provided by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through the Coastal Zone Management Act to preserve, protect, restore and enhance the resources of Pennsylvania's coastal areas and to conserve the ecological value, biological importance and historical significance that these fragile areas where the land meets the water have to our environment. In order to craft effective plans to protect coastal waters, determining the source of contamination is important. Microbial source tracking has been used to identify fecal sources. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Horse, Elk, Beaver, Bird and Ruminant. Eligible applicants for CRM grants include state agencies, local governments and authorities, schools and universities and incorporated non-profit organizations.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed. For more information, contact Stacey Box or Karen Price at 717-772-5622 or sbox@pa.gov.

Coldwater Conservation Grants Program

DESCRIPTION:
The Coldwater Conservation Grants Program provides two grant opportunities, which help to protect and conserve the health of Pennsylvania's coldwater ecosystems. The two grant opportunities are: Planning Grant and Implementation Grant. The Planning Grant is designed to help develop a conservation plan that identifies the values and threats that impact the health of Pennsylvania's coldwater ecosystems that have naturally reproducing trout. The collected information can be used as a catalyst for more comprehensive planning or for development of watershed improvements projects. Planning grants average around $5,000. The Implementation Grant is designed to provide funding to projects recommended in a completed conservation plan or report. Potential projects must enhance, conserve or protect the coldwater stream for which the coldwater conservation plan was originally completed. Implementation grants average around $7,000. In identifying potential impacts, threats and problems to Pennsylvania's coldwater streams, microbial source tracking could be useful if fecal contamination is suspected. MST is a set of methods used to determine the host (Human, wildlife, farms, and domestic animals) that contributes fecal pollution to water bodies. Source Molecular is one of the leaders in the MST industry with more than 10 years experience providing MST services to various clients. The Coldwater Heritage Partnership (CHP) urges watershed groups, conservation districts, municipalities and local chapters of Trout Unlimited to apply for Coldwater Conservation Grants.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed. For more information, e-mail info@coldwaterheritage.org.

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Growing Greener Watershed Protection Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Nonpoint Source Management Program includes Growing Greener Watershed Protection Grants that support projects that will improve water quality in an impaired watershed including those polluted by agricultural, urban runoff and Abandoned Mine Drainage. Other eligible projects include projects in non-impaired watersheds and Special Protection watersheds that protect water quality, where the watershed is threatened to become impaired due to nonpoint sources. The Department has prioritized activities and watersheds along with special watershed considerations to focus its efforts on protecting and improving water quality. In its 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria, the EPA recognized that molecular source tracking tools may be useful in managing recreational waters to better protect public health. MST tools may also be useful in confirming the presumed sources of fecal contamination in the watershed. Source Molecular Corporation has been providing MST services for more than 10 years. Eligible applicants to Growing Greener Watershed Protection Grants include incorporated watershed associations, counties or municipalities, county conservation districts, Council of Governments, tax exempt corporations, educational institutions and municipal authorities.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.

Rivers Conservation Program

DESCRIPTION:
The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, through its Bureau of Recreation and Conservation, administers a Rivers Conservation Program where grants are awarded to municipalities, counties, municipal authorities, educational institutions and non-profit organizations to develop watershed/river-corridor conservation plans; acquire land or develop projects to address the recommendations in those plans; only for sites/locations listed on the PA Rivers Conservation Registry and recommended in a completed Rivers Conservation Plan. The Bureau will consider early implementation development projects for funding in watersheds not linked to a Rivers Conservation Plan if the project can stand on its own merits and presents a significant and unique opportunity that connects communities to their rivers and advances the goals of the Rivers Conservation Program. Surface water bodies like rivers are susceptible to nonpoint source pollution. For example, polluted runoff from agricultural areas would drain into nearby rivers and streams. Microbial source tracking might be necessary if fecal contamination is suspected and there's a need to determine the source in order to craft effective plans for the remediation of the polluted river. In Source Molecular's MST laboratory, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technology is used to identify the presence of microorganisms in water samples based on the unique genetic sequence of that organism. The Rivers Conservation Grants require a minimum of a 50% match, which can include a combination of Cash and/or Non-Cash values.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.

Section 319 Nonpoint Source Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection receives Section 319(h) Nonpoint Source grant funds from the EPA each year to implement Pennsylvania's approved Nonpoint Source Management Program. Eligible projects are those applications that implement project sites including mining projects identified in a 319 Priority Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP). If funds remain after funding projects within 319 WIP watersheds, applications that implement projects that address nonpoint sources of pollution to restore or improve water quality of impaired water bodies (Integrated List) or protect water quality where threatened by impairment from nonpoint sources outside 319 priority watersheds may be considered. One of the likely contaminants in NPS pollution is fecal bacteria. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular uses a 27-step DNA extraction kit in conducting MST analysis of water samples to avoid false negative results. Eligible applicants for Section 319 Nonpoint Source Grants include incorporated watershed associations, counties or municipalities, county conservation districts, Council of Governments, tax exempt corporations, educational institutions, and municipal authorities.

DEADLINE:
Applications are due January 13, 2017.

Water Sciences Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center (PA-WRRC) and Pennsylvania Sea Grant invite faculty of all Pennsylvania colleges and universities to submit proposals for research or outreach addressing water resources issues in Pennsylvania. Both organizations fund small grants in the areas of research, education, and outreach to foster science-based decisions about water resources. Highest priority is given to projects that advance understanding of important water resources issues in Pennsylvania. Projects must, among others, address water resources issues of major importance to Pennsylvania. Current areas of research interest include, but are not limited to understanding sources, effects, or remediation of pollutants (e.g., nutrients, pesticides, emerging contaminants); and prevention of pollution. Fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes of water quality impairment in the United States. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses qPCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. Academic Faculty at public or private colleges and universities in Pennsylvania may lead proposals. Permanent research personnel (e.g., research professor or extension specialist) may also lead proposals as their colleges and universities allow. Post-docs, graduate students, and other temporary appointees are not eligible to apply.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.

WREN Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Water Resources Education Network (WREN) is a project of the Citizen Education Fund of the League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania (LWVPA-CEF). WREN provides grants for local coalition building to promote community awareness and development of public policies necessary to protect Pennsylvania water resources. The WREN Project has two clean water initiatives: Watershed Protection Education to prevent nonpoint source pollution, and Source Water Protection Promotion to raise awareness about the importance of protecting public drinking water sources. Polluted runoff, also known as nonpoint source pollution, is a major cause of water quality problems in Pennsylvania and nationwide. Some pollutants occur naturally, such as manure or pet wastes. Drinking water sources are also vulnerable to a variety of potential sources of contamination that include both point and nonpoint sources of pollution. Microbial Source Tracking is a series of scientific methods used to detect the sources that may be contributing to fecal pollution in the environment. Should WREN Projects need insights on the water contaminant, Source Molecular provides unlimited assistance to clients seeking to identify fecal pollution sources. WREN welcomes proposals from municipalities and other government entities, watershed associations, civic groups, conservation organizations that promote local watershed efforts, community water systems, educational entities, or other governmental or non-governmental organizations.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed.


Puerto Rico - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

University of Puerto Rico Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION:
The University of Puerto Rico Sea Grant College Program (UPRSGCP) is seeking proposals for the 2014-2016 biennium. One of the research priorities is Healthy Ecosystems and Habitats. The UPR Sea Grant supports projects that produce sound scientific knowledge related to the dynamics and processes working in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and regional Caribbean tropical insular marine ecosystems and associated habitats. These would include watersheds, beaches, coral reefs, estuaries, wetlands, and the living resources they contain. Research should have outcomes which improve the understanding of coastal ecosystem processes and the influence that anthropogenic activities have on them. This science is expected to aid the development of appropriate technologies and management methods and tools that will support improved, restored, or protected coastal ecosystems and resources. Coastal waters are also affected by fecal pollution through inefficient sewage treatment plants, leaking septic systems, agricultural runoff, among others. Identification of the source of fecal pollution is important in solving problems in coastal ecosystems. Source Molecular specializes in microbial source tracking analysis that uses Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technology to identify the presence of microorganisms in water samples based on the unique genetic sequence of that organism. The RFP is open to all researchers except those currently employed by Sea Grant. Researchers are encouraged to read the Strategic Plan 2014-2017, available at: http://www.seagrantpr.org.

DEADLINE:
The application period is closed.


Rhode Island - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Nonpoint Source Implementation Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management's Nonpoint Source Pollution Program particularly concentrates on the development of innovative pollution management policies and water quality management using the watershed approach while focusing on areas such as septic programs and wetlands policy, marina management, land use planning, soil erosion and sediment control, and stormwater management. Grant funds come from the Clean Water Act Section 319 Nonpoint Source Program administered by the EPA. Eligible projects include those that control or abate nonpoint source pollution impairments that have been characterized by a water quality restoration plan. Source Molecular has been assisting researchers in various NPS-related projects that have a component for microbial source tracking analysis. MST is used to identify the source of fecal contamination in water samples. Eligible applicants for the Nonpoint Source Implementation Grants include municipal, state, or regional governments; quasi-state agencies; public schools and universities; and nonprofit watershed, environmental, or conservation organizations.

DEADLINE:
For more information about the Nonpoint Source Grant Program, contact Betsy Dake by e-mail at Betsy.Dake@dem.ri.gov or by phone at 401-222-4700 x7230 or Ernie Panciera at Ernie.Panciera@dem.ri.gov or 401-222-4700 x7603.

South Carolina - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

319 Nonpoint Source Pollution Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) is seeking project proposals for funding with grants provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) under Section 319(h) of the Clean Water Act. Proposals will be accepted for the development of watershed-based plans as well as watershed-based plan implementation projects, as defined by federal 319 grant guidance. Watershed-based plans are documents that identify a pollutant in a watershed, determine the sources of that pollutant and describe what needs to be done to address each source. Up to $155,000 is available for development of watershed-based plans, no in-kind or cash match required. Proposals for watershed-based plan implementation projects may either implement a portion of a plan, or a complete plan; up to $810,000 available - 40% in-kind or cash match required. All projects are designed to implement Best Management Practices (BMPs) in a manner that leads to significant reduction in the nonpoint source pollutant load to a waterbody. Source Molecular has been involved with numerous projects addressing NPS pollution as researchers saw the need to identify the source of fecal pollution in their water samples. Source Molecular uses microbial source tracking analysis and processes water samples using a 27-step DNA extraction kit to avoid false negative results. South Carolina public organizations such as state agencies, local governments, public universities, soil and water conservation districts, regional planning commissions, watershed organizations and nonprofit organizations are eligible to receive NPS grants.

DEADLINE:
For inquiries, contact Nonpoint Source Coordinator Scott Hagins at (803) 898-1584.

South Carolina Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION:
The South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium is now soliciting proposals for consideration and possible inclusion in the Consortium's Biennial Program Plan for fiscal years 2018-19 and 2019-20. The Consortium is requesting Sea Grant Concept Letters on innovative research, education, and extension activities which seek to address major issues, problems, and opportunities and, at the same time, increase the knowledge and understanding of marine and coastal resources by the citizens of the state and region. Consortium program priorities fall within the context of the NOAA National Sea Grant College Program Strategic Plan and the Consortium’s final draft FY18-21 Strategic Plan and focus on critical marine and coastal resource needs and opportunities for South Carolina and the region.

DEADLINE: Full Proposals are due June 23, 2017.


South Dakota - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Clean Water Act Section 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION:
Clean Water Act Section 319(h) funds are provided to the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources for the purpose of managing the state's nonpoint source program and funding projects that identify and address NPS pollution problems. Section 319 implementation project funds are awarded to support the most effective and highest priority projects. Projects can be in these general categories -- watershed, ground water, and information and education. Section 319 funds may be used for watershed assessment/planning and implementation, ground water, and information and education projects that control NPS pollution. The Department has assigned funding priority to watershed assessment/planning and implementation projects that develop or implement clusters of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) located in relatively close proximity and that include EPA's Nine Key Elements for Watershed-Based Planning. For projects that aim to identify sources of fecal contamination in water systems, microbial source tracking analysis can be of great help. MST uses genetic markers to interpret data. Some characteristics associated with feces from a particular source allow that type of feces to be identified. Source Molecular's laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. Governmental agencies; subdivisions of state government such as conservation districts, water development districts, counties, and municipalities; universities; certain nonprofit organizations; and recognized American Indian Tribes are eligible to apply for Section 319 funds.

DEADLINE:
The current grant round is closed. Contact Barry A. McLaury at the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources via e-mail at Barry.McLaury@state.sd.us for more information.


Tennessee - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The application period for the 2013 grant round is closed.

Nonpoint Source Section 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Tennessee Department of Agriculture Nonpoint Source Program (TDA-NPS) is seeking project proposals for funding with grants provided by the EPA under section 319(h) of the Clean Water Act. The highest priority for funding are projects that target waters of the state assessed as impaired from nonpoint source pollution. The project's objective should be to identify the specific sources of NPS pollution and seek to eliminate them so that the water fully supports its designated uses. Preference is given to projects targeting small watersheds, where measurable water quality improvements are most likely to result after the project is completed. NPS pollution has been identified as the largest source of water quality problems in the country, affecting 40 percent of its surveyed rivers, lakes, and estuaries. One of the likely contaminants in NPS pollution is fecal bacteria. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. Local governments, interstate agencies, nonprofit organizations and institutions, colleges and universities, and agencies of state government are eligible to apply for 319 grants.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For more information, contact Sam Marshall at sam.marshall@tn.gov

Tennessee Healthy Watershed Initiative Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Tennessee Healthy Watershed Initiative is a collaboration of federal, state and nonprofit organizations committed to maintaining and improving water resources in Tennessee watersheds. It supports the implementation of certain projects that are designed to protect and maintain the state's healthy watersheds; prevent watersheds from becoming impaired; and accelerate restoration successes on impaired streams. Eligible projects include restoration projects and scientific research and monitoring. Source Molecular has been involved in various watershed protection and restoration projects through its microbial source tracking services that allow researchers to identify sources of fecal contamination in water systems. Eligible applicants for the Tennessee Healthy Watershed Initiative Grants are federal, state, local and nonprofit agencies.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.


Texas - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

319 Nonpoint Source Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board administer federal grants for activities that prevent or reduce nonpoint source pollution. Grants are awarded annually and fund projects for up to three years. The grants are made available through a federal program authorized under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. To be eligible for funding, a project must address the objectives, goals and/or priorities identified in the State of Texas Nonpoint Source Management Program or nonpoint source elements in the Texas Coastal Management Plan. Priority is given to funding development and implementation of watershed protection plans and alternative watershed-based plans. Projects that implement permit requirements for storm water are not eligible for funding. However, storm water management activities not required by permit might be eligible for assistance. Also, even in areas with storm water permits, low impact development practices and retrofits of storm water control structures are usually eligible for funding. All nonprofit organizations, and all state agencies or political subdivisions of the State of Texas -- including cities, counties, school districts, state universities, and special districts -- are eligible for 319 Grants.

DEADLINE: For more information, contact Adrian Kyle, by email at adrian.kyle@tceq.texas.gov or by fax at 512-239-0823.

Regional Water Plans/Planning Group Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Texas Water Development Board Executive Administrator administers funds to develop regional water plans.  The Texas regional water planning process allows individuals representing at least 12 interest groups to serve as members of Regional Water Planning Groups (RWPG) to prepare regional water plans for their respective areas. These plans make recommendations for strategies to meet future water supply needs, conserve water supplies, and respond to future droughts in the planning areas.  Each regional water plan includes information about water supplies and demands, water quality problems affecting water supply, and social and economic characteristics of the region.  One of the potential water quality problems is fecal contamination.  High concentrations of fecal pollution pose serious health risks to the public.  If this problem is detected, it is important to address it right away.  Identifying the source of fecal contamination is necessary to craft effective remediation plans.  Source Molecular has assisted hundreds of researchers through its microbial source tracking services by providing results that tell which host contributed the most and by how much.  The TWDB Executive Administrator publishes notice in the Texas Register advising RWPGs that funds are available and that applications will be accepted to develop regional water plans.

DEADLINE: If you have questions regarding preparation of an application, please contact Temple McKinnon at the Texas Water Development Board through telephone (512) 475-2057 or via e-mail temple.mckinnon@twdb.texas.gov.

Texas Sea Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Texas Sea Grant develops and supports research, education and outreach programs and partnerships and relies on the public for knowledge, advice and guidance. Texas Sea Grant is a unique partnership that unites the resources of the federal government, the State of Texas and universities across the state to create knowledge, tools, products and services that benefit the economy, the environment and the citizens of Texas. To help the nation understand, manage and use its coastal resources wisely, Sea Grant identified four focus areas central to what Sea Grant does. The focus areas are: healthy coastal ecosystems; sustainable fisheries and aquaculture; resilient communities and economies; and environmental literacy and workforce development. Fecal pollution is one of the threats to coastal waters. Microbial source tracking has been shown to produce highly accurate results when it comes to detecting the presence of fecal indicators and determining the host source. For more than 10 years, Source Molecular has analyzed thousands of samples making it one of the leaders in the microbial source tracking industry.

DEADLINE: Pre-proposals are due January 20, 2017, while full proposals are due April 3, 2017.



Utah - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Nonpoint Source Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Utah Division of Water Quality provides state and federal funding to reduce NPS pollution in priority watersheds throughout the state. Section 319 funding is awarded each year to the State of Utah through a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency in accordance with Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. State Nonpoint Source Funding is provided by the Utah Water Quality Board every year from the interest on loans to communities for the maintenance and construction of sanitary sewage systems. The Water Quality Board recognizes that NPS pollution is a growing problem while point source pollution is progressively being dealt with through improved treatment. These funds are used for on-the-ground implementation, NPS studies, and information and education efforts to promote the protection and improvement of water quality. One of the likely contaminants in NPS pollution is fecal bacteria. Microbial source tracking is useful in identifying specific sources of fecal coliform causing high levels of bacteria in water bodies. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. There are no restrictions on who can apply, and all applications that are submitted are considered for funding. The targeted basin for 2015 will be the Colorado River Watershed Management Units. However, State NPS grants can be used to fund high priority projects in other areas of the state.

DEADLINE: The current application period is closed.


Vermont - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Lake Champlain Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION:
The Lake Champlain Sea Grant (LCSG) requests proposals for applied research to improve understanding, use, and management of Lake Champlain and Lake George, the basin's inland waters and the Great Lakes in general. One of the goals for the LCSG Coherent Area Program (CAP) is to support research to promote ecosystem-based approaches that foster a healthy and diverse ecosystem and provide for sustainable human use and enjoyment of Lake Champlain, the basin, and surrounding waters. LCSG is also seeking proposals that will provide knowledge to reduce the effects of environmental stressors and promote restoration of degraded ecosystems. Stressors of particular concern in the basin include stormwater management. Fecal pollution has been known to wind up in stormwater runoff. Microbial source tracking is a method used to determine the fecal source. Source Molecular is a leader in implementing microbial source tracking projects. Its MST laboratory uses Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) technology to identify the presence of microorganisms in water samples based on the unique genetic sequences. Variations in DNA sequences between living organisms make it possible to distinguish between these organisms through molecular biology techniques. Investigators from universities, colleges, and other nonprofit institutions in Vermont and New York State are eligible to apply for funding through LCSG.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed. For more information, contact Elissa Schuett at elissa.schuett@uvm.edu.

Watershed Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The Vermont Agency of Natural Resources awards grants to municipalities, local or regional governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, and citizen groups that aim to promote watershed awareness, reduce water pollution and carry out projects that may involve activities such as monitoring the water quality of swimming holes in town to find out if there are health risks and then holding town forums to report results and decide on problem solutions. Fecal pollution in water bodies is one of the health risks. Microbial source tracking is a method used to determine the fecal source. Source Molecular is a leader in implementing microbial source tracking projects. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. Individuals and state and federal agencies are not eligible to receive Watershed Grant funds directly but may be partners of a project. Half of the proceeds derived from the sale of the Vermont Conservation License Plate go towards funding the Vermont Watershed Grants program.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.


Virginia - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Nonpoint Source Grant Program

DESCRIPTION:
The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is making $2.5 million in grant funding available to support projects and local programs that will result in nonpoint source (NPS) pollution reductions. The DEQ has issued a Request for Applications (RFA) that is targeted at non-agricultural projects that help meet local and Chesapeake Bay water quality goals. Projects with the highest NPS reductions compared to the dollars requested will be given priority. Funding is available, state-wide, for projects that reduce NPS pollution from stormwater runoff, failing onsite sewage disposal systems, abandoned or orphaned mine lands, or other non-agricultural sources of NPS pollution. Nonpoint source pollution is a significant cause of degradation of state waters. One of the possible NPS contaminants is fecal matter. In determining the source of fecal contamination in water bodies, microbial source tracking has been known to produce accurate results. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. Only soil and water conservation districts, planning district commissions and non-profit organizations (501(c)3) that are operating or serving as a local or regional watershed organization and/or watershed roundtable are considered eligible to apply.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Virginia Mini-Grant

DESCRIPTION:
Virginia Environmental Endowment, a nonprofit, independent corporation, administers the Virginia Mini-Grant Program. With grants of $5,000 or less, volunteers have monitored water quality in dozens of local streams and rivers, and communities have developed innovative strategies to ensure environmental quality is improved in their community. The Virginia Mini-Grant Program supports community-based efforts to strengthen environmental education and to promote stewardship of Virginia's waterways. These are intended to be one-time, start-up grants, and preference is given to modest local projects. Aside from Environmental Education, the Program aims to increase public involvement in the restoration and protection of Virginia's water resources through water quality testing and monitoring, pollution prevention, and public education. Mini-Grants may include support research, data collection and analysis. Source Molecular has been involved in helping organizations identify and eliminate fecal pollution in their watersheds through its molecular source tracking services. Its laboratory analyzes water samples and detects the DNA of fecal indicator organisms in water. Public and private schools (K-12) and nongovernmental, nonprofit community organizations in Virginia are eligible to apply for one-year awards up to $5,000. Local, state, and federal government agencies and programs are not eligible.

DEADLINE: Applications must be received by June 15 and December 1 each year. For more information, contact Gerald P. McCarthy, Executive Director, by phone: (804) 644-5000 or by e-mail: info@vee.org.

Water Quality Improvement Grants

DESCRIPTION:
Virginia's Water Quality Improvement Fund was created with the purpose of restoring and improving the quality of state waters and to protect them from impairment and destruction. The fund provides water quality improvement grants to local governments, soil and water conservation districts and individuals for point and nonpoint source pollution prevention, reduction and control programs. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is responsible for administering point source grants, and the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) administers nonpoint source grants. Nonpoint source pollution is a significant cause of degradation of state waters. One of the possible NPS contaminants is fecal matter. Should a need arise to identify the fecal source, microbial source tracking analysis has been shown to produce highly accurate results. Source Molecular, which has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development, provides support to researchers with project design as well as sampling materials at no cost.

DEADLINE: For more information about WQIF grants, contact the grant manager via email at swmgrants@dcr.virginia.gov. Those with specific questions about developing nonpoint source water quality improvement grant proposals should contact the regional manager in the appropriate DCR regional office for FY2014 grants.



Washington - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Clean Water Act Section 319 Federal Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Washington Department of Ecology uses Centennial funding for nonpoint source projects that meet the Section 319 criteria.  Section 319 funds projects including nonpoint source water pollution control activities.  All proposed nonpoint source activity projects must implement an element of a state or local plan directed at addressing water quality issues (e.g., watershed management plan, nonpoint source pollution control plan).  Ecology may also provide grant funding for water quality monitoring projects.  Monitoring is undertaken to characterize the existing conditions of ground waters and surface waters, to identify or quantify pollutant sources or loads, or to establish the effectiveness of Best Management Practices.  Monitoring may be the entire project or a component of a larger project.  Fecal contamination is one of the sources of water pollution.  Microbial source tracking methods have been used to identify the source of fecal contamination.  Source Molecular has performed thousands of MST tests in the past 10 years using the latest scientific laboratory equipment and analytical methods that enable it to identify with high confidence sources of microbial contamination.  Eligible applicants for Section 319 Grants include counties, cities, and towns; water districts, sewer districts, and other special purpose districts; conservation districts; political subdivisions; municipal or quasi-municipal corporations; federally recognized tribes; Washington State institutions of higher education; and not-for-profit organizations. SFY 2018 Funding Guidelines can be found here.

DEADLINE: The current deadline has passed.

Washington Sea Grant

DESCRIPTION: Washington Sea Grant is requesting proposals to implement its 2018–2022 Strategic Plan. Applicants may propose to conduct projects that align with any of four critical program areas laid out in the WSG Strategic Plan. However, the proposal must identify the areas addressed and explain how the project contributes to WSG strategic goals. Critical program areas are not mutually exclusive and successful proposals often fit into more than one. The four areas are: 1. Healthy Coastal Ecosystems; 2. Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture; 3. Resilient Communities and Economies; and 4. Ocean Literacy and Workforce Development. In addition to WSG’s critical program areas, investigators are encouraged to align with priorities identified by state, regional, tribal and national organizations.

DEADLINE: Full proposals are due June 1, 2017.


West Virginia - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Environmental Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: American Water administers an Environmental Grant Program that awards grants up to $10,000 to support diverse types of environmental sustainability activities. To qualify for Environmental Grant funding, project activities and outcomes should address a watershed or source water protection need in the local community within American Water service areas. Source water protection projects are activities that result in the protection or improvement of the community's public drinking water supplies. Watershed protection projects should focus on activities that improve, restore or protect one or more watersheds. Roughly 20,000 water bodies in the United States are impaired and fecal pollution has been identified as one of the major causes. In protecting watersheds and water sources, addressing fecal pollution is a potential issue. Microbial source tracking makes identifying the source of fecal contamination possible. Source Molecular uses quantitative PCR DNA technology to get more accurate results. The Company has assisted numerous researchers in its 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. American Water requires at least two partners involved in the project. Examples of partners could be municipalities, local environmental groups, conservation districts and schools.

DEADLINE: The application period for the 2013 grant round is closed.

Nonpoint Source Section 319 Grants

DESCRIPTION:
The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection has a Nonpoint Source Program that coordinates multi-agency and non-government organizations efforts to address nonpoint pollution by providing assistance in the proper installation and maintenance of (BMPs); supporting citizen based watershed organizations; supporting partners whose activities relate to nonpoint issues; and restoring impaired watersheds with nonpoint abatement projects. The NPS Program offers 319 grants for the development of plans and projects that target nonpoint pollution. These grants are used for NPS Program funds and Watershed project funds. Watershed project grants attempt to restore waters impaired by nonpoint pollution and are driven by the 303(d) list and TMDL development. Microbial source tracking has been widely used in TMDL development and implementation. Specifically, researchers have used MST to identify the sources that contribute to the observed impairment, determine which sources are likely the most dominant in the watershed of interest, and focus management actions through targeting implementation and identifying controls that are appropriate and relevant to the identified sources. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. The Company uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment in microbial source tracking. Its laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts.

DEADLINE: For additional information, contact the NPS Program Coordinator at timothy.d.craddock@wv.gov.

Stream Partners Grant

DESCRIPTION:
Stream Partners is a cooperative effort of the West Virginia Conservation Agency, West Virginia's Division of Environmental Protection, Division of Forestry, and the Division of Natural Resources. The program is housed within the DEP's Division of Water and Waste Management. The goal of the Stream Partners Program is to create sustainable organizations for environmental protection and restoration. $5,000 Seed Grants are available to help watershed associations form partnerships to complete sustainable watershed improvement projects. Watershed Improvement Projects funded include water quality monitoring and water quality improvements. Microbial source tracking could be a possible component of a water quality-related project. MST can detect the sources of fecal contamination in water systems. Source Molecular has performed thousands of MST tests in the past 10 years using the latest scientific laboratory equipment and analytical methods that enable it to identify with high confidence sources of microbial contamination. Eligible applicants are community-based organizations comprised of local citizens, industry, environmental groups, sportsmen, local government, and landowners that are interested in improving the quality of life in and around their stream and watershed.

DEADLINE: Applications for funds are accepted on September 15th of every year.


Wisconsin - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Dane County Urban Water Quality Grant

DESCRIPTION: Dane County in Wisconsin administers an Urban Water Quality Grant Program, which seeks to improve the quality of urban stormwater runoff entering Dane County lakes, rivers and streams, increase public awareness of urban water quality issues, and provide public education for urban stormwater quality improvement practices. The project goals will be achieved through the construction of best management practices that will provide efficient, cost-effective treatment of urban runoff. Financial assistance is available to municipalities. Runoff may carry fecal matter into Dane County's water systems. Should a need arise to identify the fecal source, microbial source tracking analysis has been shown to produce highly accurate results. Source Molecular, which has more than 10 years of experience in MST research and development, provides support to researchers with project design as well as sampling materials at no cost.

DEADLINE: For more information, contact the Dane County Land and Water Resources Department by telephone at 608-224-3764 or by e-mail at lakes@countyofdane.com.

Lake Classification & Lake Protection Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources administers the Lake Classification & Lake Protection Grants Program. Eligible projects for Lake Classification Grants include data collection and analysis necessary for water classification. Counties that have adopted a lake classification system are also eligible for implementation grants. Eligible implementation projects include support programs resulting from lake classification (such as shoreline restoration technical assistance). Eligible projects for Lake Protection Grants include restoration of wetlands and shorelands that will protect a lake's water quality or its natural ecosystem. Too much fecal matter can affect the water quality of a lake and pose a health risk to swimmers. Microbial source tracking can be useful in water quality monitoring. There are numerous MST methods to detect fecal contamination. MST is used specifically to identify the source of fecal contamination. Source Molecular's laboratory can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant. This is an advantage since lakes are susceptible to runoff. Only counties can apply for Lake Classification Grants while counties, towns, cities, villages, tribes, qualified non-profit conservation organizations, qualified lake associations, qualified school districts, public inland lake protection and rehabilitation districts, town sanitary districts and other local governmental units that are established for the purpose of lake management, are eligible to apply for funding to collect and analyze information needed to protect and restore lakes and their watersheds.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Lake Management Planning Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources administers the Lake Management Planning Grants Program, which aims to collect and analyze information needed to protect and restore lakes and their watersheds. Eligible projects include water quality, aquatic plant or other monitoring activities; gathering and analysis of physical, chemical, and biological information on lakes. If fecal contamination is suspected in lakes, microbial source tracking could be a useful tool if there's also a need to determine the source in order to craft effective plans for the remediation of the polluted lake. Source Molecular is one of the leaders in the MST industry with more than 10 years experience providing MST services to various clients. Counties, towns, cities, villages, tribes, qualified non-profit conservation organizations, qualified lake associations, qualified school districts, public inland lake protection and rehabilitation districts, town sanitary districts and other local governmental units that are established for the purpose of lake management, are eligible to apply for funding to collect and analyze information needed to protect and restore lakes and their watersheds.

DEADLINE: Applications must be received in DNR regional offices and postmarked no later than February 1 for the spring grant cycle and August 1 for the fall grant cycle.

River Protection Planning & River Protection Management Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources administers the River Protection Planning & River Protection Management Grants Program. River planning grants assist in the formation of a qualified river management organization or in strengthening an existing organization; protection or improvement of rivers and their ecosystems; river improvement education projects; assessments and plan development. River management grants are available for purchasing land or conservation easements, local ordinance development, installation of nonpoint source pollution control practices and river restoration activities. They may also be used for education, planning and design activities necessary for completion of a management project. Eligible planning projects include collection and assessment of water quality, water quantity, and biological or environmental data. Surface water bodies like rivers are susceptible to nonpoint source pollution. For example, polluted runoff from agricultural areas would drain into nearby rivers and streams. Microbial source tracking might be necessary if fecal contamination is suspected and there's a need to determine the source in order to craft effective plans for the remediation of the polluted river. In Source Molecular's MST laboratory, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technology is used to identify the presence of microorganisms in water samples based on the unique genetic sequence of that organism. Counties, cities, towns, villages, tribes, other local governmental units, qualified river management organizations, and qualified nonprofit conservation organizations are eligible to apply for River Protection Planning & River Protection Management Grants.

DEADLINE: Applications must be received in the DNR regional office postmarked no later than May 1.

Sweet Water Mini-Grant Program

DESCRIPTION: The Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust, Inc., administers a Water Quality Mini-Grant Program, which provides grants for projects or activities that aims to achieve healthy and sustainable water resources. Eligible projects include water quality-related activities that will improve water quality. Mini-grants may be used for a single project or for an on-going program, but preference will be given to projects with the potential to make a direct impact on water quality and to offer a long-lasting impact to the community. One of the potential water quality problems is fecal contamination. High concentrations of fecal pollution pose serious health risks to the public. Microbial source tracking identifies the source of fecal contamination, which can lead to better remediation plans. Source Molecular has assisted hundreds of researchers with its MST services. Eligible applicants for the Mini Grants include established non-profit organizations, community and civic groups.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Targeted Runoff Management Grants Program

DESCRIPTION: The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources administers the Targeted Runoff Management Grants Program, which offers competitive grants for local governments to control nonpoint source pollution. Eligible projects include total daily maximum load (TMDL) projects and agricultural and urban nonpoint source control projects designed to meet EPA-approved TMDL goals. Eligible costs include construction of structural best management practices and implementation of non-structural cropping practices. Microbial source tracking has been widely used in TMDL development and implementation. Specifically, researchers have used MST to identify the sources that contribute to the observed impairment, determine which sources are likely the most dominant in the watershed of interest, and focus management actions through targeting implementation and identifying controls that are appropriate and relevant to the identified sources. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. The Company uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment in microbial source tracking. Cities, villages, towns, counties, regional planning commissions, tribal governments, and special purpose lake, sewerage and sanitary districts may apply for Targeted Runoff Management Grants.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Urban Nonpoint Source & Storm Water Management Grants Program

DESCRIPTION: The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources administers the Urban Nonpoint Source & Storm Water Management Grant Program, which offers competitive grants to local governments for planning or construction projects controlling urban nonpoint source and storm water runoff pollution. Eligible projects include illicit discharge detection and elimination. Improperly treated sewage can be released as a result of upsets to the treatment process, as a result of infrastructure failure, or as a result of operator error. It can be a significant source of fecal contamination. To confirm if water systems contain harmful levels of fecal bacteria, microbial source tracking can be used because it can also tell from what host the bacteria comes from. Source Molecular's laboratory provides MST results in as little as one working day. Eligible applicants for the Urban Nonpoint Source & Storm Water Management Grants Program include cities, villages, towns, counties, regional planning commissions, tribal governments and special purpose lake, sewage, or sanitary districts.

DEADLINE: The current grant round is closed.

Well Abandonment Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources provides financial assistance for individuals to properly abandon unused private wells. Unused wells are a direct line for contamination into clean ground water. The DNR will cover eligible costs up to the invoice amount, less the 25 percent cost-share requirement. Well abandonment work must be done according to DNR specifications and the unused private well must be properly abandoned and filled by a licensed well driller or pump installer before payment will be made. Other costs may be eligible if deemed necessary and approved by the ground water program manager. Microbial source tracking analysis may be useful if fecal contamination is suspected. Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in microbial source tracking research and development. Low income landowner, landowner's spouse, heir, assignee/legal representative or renter with an unused private well that needs abandoning may apply for Well Abandonment Grants.

DEADLINE: Applications may be submitted at any time.


Wyoming - Potential Microbial Source Tracking Funding

Nonpoint Source Pollution Control (Section 319) Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ), Water Quality Division (WQD) will implement a Nonpoint Source Program. The program will work with local agencies, communities, watershed groups, and individuals to promote locally-led projects. The program seeks to build new partnerships and to maintain and improve existing partnerships with other state, local and federal agencies, watershed groups, non-profit organizations, and other parties or individuals also seeking to reduce nonpoint sources of pollution and improve water quality. The Nonpoint Source Program promotes a watershed-based approach to planning and implementing nonpoint source pollution management. The goal of the Wyoming NPS Program is to identify sources of nonpoint source pollution to surface water and ground water of the State of Wyoming and to prevent and reduce nonpoint source pollution such that water quality standards are achieved and maintained. The NPS Program accepts proposals for projects to be awarded under Section 319(h) of the Clean Water Act. Eligible projects under Section 319 Grants are all projects that demonstrate the real potential to improve water quality by reducing nonpoint source pollution. Microbial source tracking might be necessary if fecal contamination is suspected. In Source Molecular's MST laboratory, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technology is used to identify from which host the fecal bacteria in the water sample came from. Source Molecular can detect fecal contamination from 13 hosts -- Human, Cattle, Swine, Gull, Goose, Chicken, Dog, Deer, Elk, Horse, Bird, Beaver and Ruminant.

DEADLINE: The Wyoming Nonpoint Source Program is not currently accepting proposals for Section 319 and Section 205(j) funding. For more information, contact Jennifer Zygmunt by telephone at 307-777-6080 or by e-mail at jennifer.zygmunt@wyo.gov.

Water Quality Planning and Assessment Section 205(j) Grants

DESCRIPTION: The Wyoming Nonpoint Source Program of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Water Quality Division (NPS Program) accepts proposals for projects to be awarded under Section 205(j) of the Clean Water Act. Under Section 205(j) of the Clean Water Act, the State of Wyoming has funds available to local planning agencies for the purpose of water quality planning and assessment. These funds are not intended for construction or implementation of water quality controls, but rather, are to be targeted for water quality planning and assessment. Only cities, counties and conservation districts are eligible to receive these planning funds. However, the local planning agency may subcontract work to other entities. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) and the Nonpoint Source Task Force are particularly interested in directing these funds to water quality improvement planning and assessment efforts for waterbodies on Wyoming's 2012 Section 303(d) List. The funds will be awarded as reimbursement grants, which means the funds are issued to the recipient only after proof of disbursements for eligible project activities. Monitoring projects are eligible. Fecal contamination might show up in water monitoring activities. Should the planning agencies need to determine the source of fecal contamination, microbial source tracking analysis might be helpful. MST is a widely used method for this type of purpose and Source Molecular has more than 10 years of experience in this field. The Company uses only the newest and most robust methods and equipment in microbial source tracking.

DEADLINE: The Wyoming Nonpoint Source Program is not currently accepting proposals for Section 319 and Section 205(j) funding. For more information, contact Jennifer Zygmunt by telephone at 307-777-6080 or by e-mail at jennifer.zygmunt@wyo.gov.
 
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